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Europe/Great Britain : Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

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Poodle_Mum
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22 Mar 2014
06:00:29pm
I came across this stamp today that has vertical black bars on the reverse side. Can anyone tell me what they mean (if indeed they have any importance at all)?

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Jansimon
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22 Mar 2014
06:18:13pm

Approvals
re: Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

See Scott catalogue #353c-360a. This is 359a or 359ap

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Poodle_Mum
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A Service Dog gives a person with a disability independence. Never approach, distract or pet a working dog, especially when (s)he is in harness. Never be afraid to ask questions to the handler (parent).
22 Mar 2014
07:08:53pm
re: Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

Thanks Happy

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BobbyBarnhart
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22 Mar 2014
07:18:34pm
re: Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

The notes in Scott will give you a Nutshell explanation. They are graphite bars and (I am sure I will be corrected if in error) were an experimental precursor to "tagging" as a control measure.

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Poodle_Mum
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A Service Dog gives a person with a disability independence. Never approach, distract or pet a working dog, especially when (s)he is in harness. Never be afraid to ask questions to the handler (parent).
22 Mar 2014
10:19:05pm
re: Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

So just use my UV light to see whether it is "a" or "ap"?

I've got to start looking more closely at some of the stuff I put up in my books. I've probably got some buyers that sit there with a grin on their faces thinking "what an idiot she is, $0.05 for a stamp that catalogues ..." It's that why people keep coming back to me? Lol

Thanks for the advice guys - I'll check it out!


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Martyn
23 Mar 2014
03:53:00am
re: Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

"The notes in Scott will give you a Nutshell explanation. They are graphite bars and (I am sure I will be corrected if in error) were an experimental precursor to "tagging" as a control measure."

As far as I am aware both the graphite line issues and the graphite line/phosphor band issues (tagged) were as stated experiments and I think only from the City of Southampton.

Those that have clipped/trimmed perfs are from booklets and if trimmed tend to be worth less as with most stamps

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cdj1122
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23 Mar 2014
03:29:38pm
re: Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

During the early '60s, when I went to sea, I returned to the stamp hobby as so many others have done. It was a good way to wile away the hours between watches and avoid getting into trouble when in distant ports.
On one long trip I begun to clean and sort a large accumulation of the Wilding Series that I had bought somewhere. I had begun to take my albums along with me, so on this trip as we were crossing the Pacific from Panama to the Far East ( Actually the distant and often mysterious Far West) I started working on this set. It didn't take long to assemble the basic color/value stamps leaving me a large pile to dispose of.
As I was about to toss all the extras into the world's biggest disposal bin (An open porthole) the ship's radio officer stopped by my room. We had become friends and he had shown me his collections of US Airmails and classic Newfoundland stamps one evening.
That afternoon, he noticed the big piles of stamps and pointed me to the different watermarks and the possibility of there being graphite lines on the reverse. When he left I went back through the waste can to start all over. That is how I started my Wilding pages.

I'd suggest, at the least, holding the on-paper stamps because every so often you will discover that there is some minor variety of a common stamp that you were not aware of, and being able to dig back through such accumulations seeking that elusive variation once you know what it is, can be rewarding. Or soak them clean so that you can further explore what is a very interesting series.
The British "Wildings" of Queen Elizabeth, 1953 to about 1967, can absorb a collector for many hours.
There are three basic sets, differentiated by water mark, the St Edwards Crown, the Tudor Crown, and the Multi Crown, but then the watermark may also be inverted, or even sideways pointing left or right. The last set with the multi crown may have the mentioned graphite lines on the reverse, or phosphor bands on the front, or even a few with both phosphor and graphite lines. That means that you can find examples with an inverted or a sideways watermark, one or two graphite lines on the rear and one or two phosphor bars on the front.
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Then most of these also exist with broad inked bars on the front to show they were used by Postal Training facilities.
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Just these major varieties of the common Wildings can fill several album pages with about 170 stamps.
Because the graphite line "experiment" failed, the remaining blank sheets were used with no regard to the placement of the black lines, so some exist with one, two or three graphite lines and they may be placed to the left side, right side or down the center.
The Red Wilding also was reprinted recently as a part of a celebratory souvenir sheetlet and is a 1st NVI with what the Brits call the "Wonkie" watermark meaning diagonally.
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Three souvenir sheetlets have been printed in recent years with the basic Wildings and decimal values.
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Then there are Wildings that were overprinted for use in Tangiers or Morocco, Kuwait or Bahrain and several that were given decimal values and issued on small panes.

So whether you simply post them inexpensively in approvals or decide to soak and examine them so that you may discover the occasional gem is your decision. That is a time consuming effort with no guarantee of monetary value. But for me they remain one of the most involved and attractive sets.
Oh, and due to the printing process that was used, there are many minor flyspeck varieties that are displayed in the Gibbons Specialty catalog.

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malcolm197
07 Nov 2014
11:57:07am
re: Vertical Bars on QE II Definitives?

Just to add on phosphor bands on Wilding definitives. These come in 3 varieties, based on the time of the afterglow.

Using a shortwave ultraviolet lamp in a totally blacked out room excite the bands with your eyes closed. Open your eyes simultaneously with switching off the lamp.Your bands will glow. The length of the time that they continue to glow will determine which active agent of phosphorence is present.

The subject is too complex for me to explain here, but no doubt there are sites which explain it fully. Note that not all values appear on all 3 phosphors - in fact the regional stamps only contain "blue" and "violet" varieties while "green" phosphor appears only on standard definitives. Note that with normal lights the colour descriptions mentioned here are not easily ( if at all) distinguished -the afterglow is the only reliable way to distinguish them. Note also that heavily soaked examples have the phosphor washed off.(Postmark dates on used examples can help)

The SG GB part 3 ( QE2 pre-dec) has full details(including dates of issue).

Malcolm

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