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Asia/Other : Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

 

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eugen01
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15 Sep 2012
07:00:01am
Hi All,
Can someone tell me why these stamps are bigger then the others.
Thanks,FrankImage Not Found

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nigelc
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15 Sep 2012
09:06:57am
re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

These are known as "wing margins". They are the result of sheets being perforated down the middle of the gutter between two panes rather than on each side of the gutter.

This approach was also used with quite a few British Victorian surface-printed issues.

Because only a small proportion of stamps in the sheet would have these wing margins you might expect them to be more valuable than stamps with regular margins; however, in the past they were often treated as second-rate copies and were often re-perfed to "improve"them for sale. I guess they were probably unpopular with collectors who were trying to fit stamps into regular-sized spaces in printed albums.

I like them.

Here's another one from Griqualand West in South Africa:

Image Not Found

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amsd
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Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads

15 Sep 2012
10:32:05am

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re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

one sees a similar phenomenon in US stamps of the same period, where instead of the enlarged margins, one sees straight edges between panes. So, on a 400-stamp sheet, one would see 80 stamps with straight edges, of which 4 would have two straight edges. Like the BC material, US stamps from the ends of panes are treated as inferior stamps by most despite the fact that they are constants in production and far rarer than the 320 stamps with 4 perforated edges.

David

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"Save the USPS, buy stamps; save the hobby, use commemoratives"

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..

15 Sep 2012
11:55:36am
re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

The philatelic world would be far easier to understand and explain if the way the "Law of Supply and Demand" and how it affects value involved a simple inverse relationship, if as one increased the other decreased. However the principle of Popularity and how it affects both supply and demand has to be understood as well.

Ordinarily, if there is a limited supply, demand and value should increase and were an unknown supply to suddenly be discovered and become available for collectors, demand should decrease proportionally as collectors fill the empty spaces and no longer are willing to pay the previously established price.

The other side of the coin would occur should some event that drastically decreased a known supply happen, thus reducing the available supply causing demand and what collectors seeking to fill those empty spaces are willing to pay would increase.

But there are things like the peviously cited "straight edged stamps", that were produced in a fraction of the volume that stamps perfed on four sides and should be considered more rare do not generate a value comparable to their numbers. Popularity reduces demand in the face of scarcity.

For many years, stamps of the Republic of China produced on the mainland prior to 1949, were sold by dealers in large unchecked lots for a pittance. I know and remember this because I bought many of these odd lots from people who were definitely knowledgeable and experienced dealers. These stamps were considered a drug on the market, unpopular and not in demand. Yet within those lots were examples of watermarks, overprints, printers issues, secret marks and color varieties that should have deserved almost unique status and astounding prices. But because of the political situation, inequities in exchange rates and the "Bamboo Curtain" further complicated by a script little understood in most of the philatelic world tamped down on popularity and thus demand.

In recent decades, demand and prices realized have gone through auction house roofs as collectors around the world have become interested in the period and seek to gather examples of these issues. Supply did not decrease. Actually it might be thought to have increased as examples lying unappreciated in old nickel a stamp shoeboxes have been rediscovered and put into play. I suppose a case could be made that the number of collectors that felt free enough to accumulate these item may have increased, but a better cause is that what were unpopular are now suddenly seen as thrilling varieties.

What results is a complex situation which reminds me of trying to comprehend and explain Boyle's law concerning the Volume, Temperature and Pressure relationship of gasses to my children for their Science classes.


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amsd
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Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads

15 Sep 2012
12:16:08pm

Auctions
re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

right, Charlie,

supply has nothing to do with demand or price. I have unique items (stamps, labels, covers) that, by rarity, ought be MegaMillions, but, alas, are not. Demand drives price far more than supply, and demand is fickle, as any collector of the once=popular PNC3 strips will attest.

In one of my specialty areas, prices for early tied Christmas seals are many fold greater than those of recent vintage, and yet, at least from a known census perspective, the latter are far rarer. It's demand, not supply.

Now, about those gasses and hot air and our ability to emulate Zeppelins, otherwise known as wind bags

David

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"Save the USPS, buy stamps; save the hobby, use commemoratives"

juicyheads.com/link.php?PLJZJP
Stampaholic
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18 Sep 2012
09:39:04am

Auctions
re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

Nigel, I like'em ,too. I would say say they're in the genre of JUMBOS.
As to theories, I understand Darwin's theory of evolution was partly based on the
study of bird guano (bird poop for less sensitive souls).

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" I have a burning love for stamps. Lord A'mighty ,feel my temperature risin'! "
        

 

Author/Postings
Members Picture
eugen01

15 Sep 2012
07:00:01am

Hi All,
Can someone tell me why these stamps are bigger then the others.
Thanks,FrankImage Not Found

Like
Login to Like
this post
Members Picture
nigelc

15 Sep 2012
09:06:57am

re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

These are known as "wing margins". They are the result of sheets being perforated down the middle of the gutter between two panes rather than on each side of the gutter.

This approach was also used with quite a few British Victorian surface-printed issues.

Because only a small proportion of stamps in the sheet would have these wing margins you might expect them to be more valuable than stamps with regular margins; however, in the past they were often treated as second-rate copies and were often re-perfed to "improve"them for sale. I guess they were probably unpopular with collectors who were trying to fit stamps into regular-sized spaces in printed albums.

I like them.

Here's another one from Griqualand West in South Africa:

Image Not Found

Like
Login to Like
this post
Members Picture
amsd

Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
15 Sep 2012
10:32:05am

Auctions

re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

one sees a similar phenomenon in US stamps of the same period, where instead of the enlarged margins, one sees straight edges between panes. So, on a 400-stamp sheet, one would see 80 stamps with straight edges, of which 4 would have two straight edges. Like the BC material, US stamps from the ends of panes are treated as inferior stamps by most despite the fact that they are constants in production and far rarer than the 320 stamps with 4 perforated edges.

David

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Save the USPS, buy stamps; save the hobby, use commemoratives"

juicyheads.com/link. ...

Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
15 Sep 2012
11:55:36am

re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

The philatelic world would be far easier to understand and explain if the way the "Law of Supply and Demand" and how it affects value involved a simple inverse relationship, if as one increased the other decreased. However the principle of Popularity and how it affects both supply and demand has to be understood as well.

Ordinarily, if there is a limited supply, demand and value should increase and were an unknown supply to suddenly be discovered and become available for collectors, demand should decrease proportionally as collectors fill the empty spaces and no longer are willing to pay the previously established price.

The other side of the coin would occur should some event that drastically decreased a known supply happen, thus reducing the available supply causing demand and what collectors seeking to fill those empty spaces are willing to pay would increase.

But there are things like the peviously cited "straight edged stamps", that were produced in a fraction of the volume that stamps perfed on four sides and should be considered more rare do not generate a value comparable to their numbers. Popularity reduces demand in the face of scarcity.

For many years, stamps of the Republic of China produced on the mainland prior to 1949, were sold by dealers in large unchecked lots for a pittance. I know and remember this because I bought many of these odd lots from people who were definitely knowledgeable and experienced dealers. These stamps were considered a drug on the market, unpopular and not in demand. Yet within those lots were examples of watermarks, overprints, printers issues, secret marks and color varieties that should have deserved almost unique status and astounding prices. But because of the political situation, inequities in exchange rates and the "Bamboo Curtain" further complicated by a script little understood in most of the philatelic world tamped down on popularity and thus demand.

In recent decades, demand and prices realized have gone through auction house roofs as collectors around the world have become interested in the period and seek to gather examples of these issues. Supply did not decrease. Actually it might be thought to have increased as examples lying unappreciated in old nickel a stamp shoeboxes have been rediscovered and put into play. I suppose a case could be made that the number of collectors that felt free enough to accumulate these item may have increased, but a better cause is that what were unpopular are now suddenly seen as thrilling varieties.

What results is a complex situation which reminds me of trying to comprehend and explain Boyle's law concerning the Volume, Temperature and Pressure relationship of gasses to my children for their Science classes.


Like
Login to Like
this post

".... You may think you understood what you thought I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you think you heard is not what I thought I meant. .... "
Members Picture
amsd

Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
15 Sep 2012
12:16:08pm

Auctions

re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

right, Charlie,

supply has nothing to do with demand or price. I have unique items (stamps, labels, covers) that, by rarity, ought be MegaMillions, but, alas, are not. Demand drives price far more than supply, and demand is fickle, as any collector of the once=popular PNC3 strips will attest.

In one of my specialty areas, prices for early tied Christmas seals are many fold greater than those of recent vintage, and yet, at least from a known census perspective, the latter are far rarer. It's demand, not supply.

Now, about those gasses and hot air and our ability to emulate Zeppelins, otherwise known as wind bags

David

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Save the USPS, buy stamps; save the hobby, use commemoratives"

juicyheads.com/link. ...
Members Picture
Stampaholic

18 Sep 2012
09:39:04am

Auctions

re: Straits Settlements: jumbo (extra wide) stamps

Nigel, I like'em ,too. I would say say they're in the genre of JUMBOS.
As to theories, I understand Darwin's theory of evolution was partly based on the
study of bird guano (bird poop for less sensitive souls).

Like
Login to Like
this post

" I have a burning love for stamps. Lord A'mighty ,feel my temperature risin'! "
        

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