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What we collect!
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What we collect!
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Sales, Swaps, Auction & Approvals/Auction Disc. : Many thanks to those who do this!!

 

Author
Postings
Harvey

I think, therefore I am - I think!

02 Aug 2022
12:19:42pm
I just got a great order from OldPaul and he does something that several of you already do, and is greatly appreciated. He sent an order of a grouping of Australia postage dues that as you know look very similar. He put them in a card and numbered them for me. That is fantastic and I wish more of you did it. It makes ID'ing easier and cuts down on possible damage as well. I know it is not always possible, especially if you buy a whole page from a book, but I think it is a huge plus if it can be done. Thanks very much to those of you who take that extra bit of time and I will buy from you more often. The rest of you, I still appreciate your great material, and thank you very much as well!!!
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""When it rains, look for rainbows; when it's dark, look for stars." Oscar Wilde "
Brechinite
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Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons

02 Aug 2022
06:06:50pm

Auctions - Approvals
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Why not go to the next logical step and get sellers to journey to the buyers house and mount the stamps in the buyers albums for them.

It would be a winner!

Rolling On The Floor LaughingRolling On The Floor LaughingRolling On The Floor Laughing

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"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
Harvey

I think, therefore I am - I think!

02 Aug 2022
06:31:43pm
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

I get it Ian! But if I buy a bunch of stamps that only differ by watermark or perforation I don't think it's too much to expect them to be identified if they were originally identified by the seller. If you sold a whole bunch of identified Machins to a person I bet you would find a way to identify them to the buyer if possible or practical. I don't expect miracles though. I got a large group of Philippine stamps from a seller who didn't have them separately IDed and certainly didn't expect him to do so. A little help is great if possible and most of the sellers here do their best.

Edit: If I came across as being demanding in this commentary that wasn't my intention. I was just giving a vote of thanks to those of you who give the little bit of extra help. Most of you do and it is greatly appreciated. I'm sorry if, again, I ticked a few people off! I am sure most of us would rather pay a little extra for postage for extra service, speaking for myself, of course!!

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""When it rains, look for rainbows; when it's dark, look for stars." Oscar Wilde "
Brechinite
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Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons

02 Aug 2022
07:46:36pm

Auctions - Approvals
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Aye, if the seller has previously identified them its no problem to put them on a stockcard or in glassines with identification. However one must bear in mind that it could increase the postage costs.

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"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
sheepshanks
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02 Aug 2022
08:22:08pm
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

One of the dealers I purchase from in UK, sets the stamps in black stock cards and writes the Catalogue number, with a sharpie, on the transparent part of the cover. This removes easily when not required using rubbing alcohol.
PS Ian, if you are coming over to Manitoba to mount my purchases, in summer bring mosquito spray (lots) and in winter your -30c+ thermals, snow boots and hand warmers. Might even find you a single malt to warm the insides.

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Brechinite
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Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons

03 Aug 2022
06:06:30pm

Auctions - Approvals
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Aye Vic I could bring stamps to you but just think of the shipping charges I would have to levy.

I worked in Northern Alberta for a while so I know exactly what your Canadian mozzies are like and your winters!

As a boy we were always shown the glorious photos of Fall in New England. The beautiful colours of the leaves turning from green to red to gold over a period of days.

The Fall in Alberta lasted a whole afternoon. At noon the temperature was 60 degrees Fahrenheit. By 6pm it was 30 degrees. It never rose above freezing for months! BBBrrrrrrr!!

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"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
Harvey

I think, therefore I am - I think!

03 Aug 2022
06:37:15pm
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Ian, Northern Alberta is damn cold. I had a friend who worked in Fort McMurray and told me stories. She worked in a little guard shack and it was heated by propane. According to her propane will not flow in temperatures under -40C and I guess she had many cold shifts. I lived in Edmonton for a while and worked part time in a meat packing plant on night clean up. After using a high pressure hose if you had to go outside for any reason your clothing would freeze almost immediately. You went outside as seldom as possible. I used to sneak out for a few minutes at about 2:00 AM to watch the sun come up even though it only went down at 11:00 PM. It's totally different living in areas like that!!! Most people don't truly understand the concept of "cold". Even in Edmonton, which is not that far up North, there were weeks where it never got warmer than -20C, a face covering if it was windy was a necessity!

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""When it rains, look for rainbows; when it's dark, look for stars." Oscar Wilde "
Brechinite
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Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons

04 Aug 2022
10:40:47am

Auctions - Approvals
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

AAHH! Edmonton.

Edmonton in July.....Klondyke Days!

Where we were the RCMP carried two pistols in the winter. Why? They couldn't reload their first gun due to the cold!

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"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
Bobstamp
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04 Aug 2022
08:11:06pm
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

We Ingrahams (I, Susan, and Paul, then a baby) moved to Prince George, BC in 1973, where I would begin my teaching career after a short-lived attempt to be a journalist. We moved into a trailer (a "mobile home") just a quarter mile from the school where I would teach Grade 7. We enjoyed the autumn (lots of bright yellow birch leaves and crisp, clear air, and then winter arrived. We weren't new to Canada's winters — we had lived for a couple of years in Ottawa, which tried to mimic the last Ice Age. Prince George's winter was something else again. Most days were not just liveable, but enjoyable. We snowshoed, took up cross-country skiing, and spent some happy Sunday afternoons on a large toboggan that we bought. But then winter — real Prince George winter! — arrived, bringing temperatures lower than I thought temperatures could go.

On the first day of our first Prince George "cold snap," I set out for my school on foot, warmly dressed in a puffy ski jacket, long johns, heavy mittens, and a WWII Arctic-issue cap complete with a plush-lined strap to keep my nose warm. I got perhaps 20 metres from our trailer when my nose started freezing shut with each breath. My eyes started watering, and tears froze on my eyelids. I did survive my walk to my school. My principal told me that he had to call a tow truck that morning to get his car into a garage to warm when. When it was towed away from his house, its wheels weren't turning.

Over the next few days, the pipes underneath our trailer froze, and I unfroze them, carefully, with a blowtorch, while trying to avoid frozen cobwebs and incinerating the trailer. Our fuel-oil heater ran pretty much full time; later that winter a heater serviceman discovered that the heater's chimney was askew, and might have asphyxiated us in our sleep!

I was concerned about the oil supply in our Jeep Wagoneer, and decided to "top it up". The oil, in cans which you punctured with a spout, was stored in a garden shed. I punctured a can of winter-weight oil and tried to empty it. It wasn't emptying. I pulled the can up to see if the spout was clogged, and it was. With oil. Frozen oil. Frozen oil with oil crystals in it, hanging in a blob from the spout. Note to self: Don't store motor oil in the garden shed in the winter. Further note to self: Install circulating block heater in Jeep.

We got a LOT of snow that winter. A record snowfall. By the time spring arrived, officially, we had 3.7 metres of snow on the ground. That's 12 feet, for you Americans. I'd often had to go up on the trailer's roof to shovel snow off, lest it collapse. Our trailer was surrounded by a nice wooden fence, with a large wooden gate. The fence and gait were covered with snow. A neighbour up the street, who own a front-end loader, offered to clear the snow from our driveway for $5. That's was bargain. Or would have been. We were watching when he began working. He drove his front-end loader right at the right side of the gate, which was invisible, but he found it, but not until he raised the scoop, which was filled with snow, and launched large pieces of the fence and gait into the air. He didn't charge us. In fact, he stopped, thought about it, backed up, turned around, and drove home. He never again offered to help, and didn't dare ask for payment. We never again asked him for help!

A couple of years later, we bought a house within bicycling distance of my school, and Prince George was still have severe winters. Here are two photos of our house in the snow. That's me on the roof, and Susan shovelling the snow that I'd already shovelled off the roof:

Image Not Found

Image Not Found

In 2000, both Susan and I retired, and moved to Vancouver, where our son was living, and still lives. We had snow for a couple of days this winter, and a lot of rain. You don't have to shovel rain.

Bob





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DannyS
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05 Aug 2022
04:45:37am
re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

I think I became allergic to cold weather in my twenties. After that I would only do jobs in warm places like Africa, Southern Europe, the Middle East, Australia and tropical Asia. There was plenty of oil work in Alaska but it didn't tempt me. I started off with a couple of years in the North Sea and decided I never wanted to go back there. Today I saw a Facebook post from a retired Finnish sea captain I know. He now lives in the Philippines. Here it is.

"I worked in the North Seas, Baltic seas and Gulf of Finland from 1966 to 1970 Never Seismic, product tankers and cargo vls.
THE NORTH SEA SEPARETE THE BOYS FROM THE MEN. THE BOYS U CAN FOOL TO STAY. THE MEN KEEP CLEAR."

Ian, I enjoyed working in the summer in Aberdeen, the Orkneys and the Western Isles, but I never enjoyed Peterhead or the ShetlandsHappy

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Author/Postings
Harvey

I think, therefore I am - I think!

02 Aug 2022
12:19:42pm

I just got a great order from OldPaul and he does something that several of you already do, and is greatly appreciated. He sent an order of a grouping of Australia postage dues that as you know look very similar. He put them in a card and numbered them for me. That is fantastic and I wish more of you did it. It makes ID'ing easier and cuts down on possible damage as well. I know it is not always possible, especially if you buy a whole page from a book, but I think it is a huge plus if it can be done. Thanks very much to those of you who take that extra bit of time and I will buy from you more often. The rest of you, I still appreciate your great material, and thank you very much as well!!!

Like 
2 Members
like this post.
Login to Like.

""When it rains, look for rainbows; when it's dark, look for stars." Oscar Wilde "
Members Picture
Brechinite

Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons
02 Aug 2022
06:06:50pm

Auctions - Approvals

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Why not go to the next logical step and get sellers to journey to the buyers house and mount the stamps in the buyers albums for them.

It would be a winner!

Rolling On The Floor LaughingRolling On The Floor LaughingRolling On The Floor Laughing

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.

"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
Harvey

I think, therefore I am - I think!

02 Aug 2022
06:31:43pm

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

I get it Ian! But if I buy a bunch of stamps that only differ by watermark or perforation I don't think it's too much to expect them to be identified if they were originally identified by the seller. If you sold a whole bunch of identified Machins to a person I bet you would find a way to identify them to the buyer if possible or practical. I don't expect miracles though. I got a large group of Philippine stamps from a seller who didn't have them separately IDed and certainly didn't expect him to do so. A little help is great if possible and most of the sellers here do their best.

Edit: If I came across as being demanding in this commentary that wasn't my intention. I was just giving a vote of thanks to those of you who give the little bit of extra help. Most of you do and it is greatly appreciated. I'm sorry if, again, I ticked a few people off! I am sure most of us would rather pay a little extra for postage for extra service, speaking for myself, of course!!

Like 
2 Members
like this post.
Login to Like.

""When it rains, look for rainbows; when it's dark, look for stars." Oscar Wilde "
Members Picture
Brechinite

Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons
02 Aug 2022
07:46:36pm

Auctions - Approvals

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Aye, if the seller has previously identified them its no problem to put them on a stockcard or in glassines with identification. However one must bear in mind that it could increase the postage costs.

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.

"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
Members Picture
sheepshanks

02 Aug 2022
08:22:08pm

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

One of the dealers I purchase from in UK, sets the stamps in black stock cards and writes the Catalogue number, with a sharpie, on the transparent part of the cover. This removes easily when not required using rubbing alcohol.
PS Ian, if you are coming over to Manitoba to mount my purchases, in summer bring mosquito spray (lots) and in winter your -30c+ thermals, snow boots and hand warmers. Might even find you a single malt to warm the insides.

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
Members Picture
Brechinite

Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons
03 Aug 2022
06:06:30pm

Auctions - Approvals

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Aye Vic I could bring stamps to you but just think of the shipping charges I would have to levy.

I worked in Northern Alberta for a while so I know exactly what your Canadian mozzies are like and your winters!

As a boy we were always shown the glorious photos of Fall in New England. The beautiful colours of the leaves turning from green to red to gold over a period of days.

The Fall in Alberta lasted a whole afternoon. At noon the temperature was 60 degrees Fahrenheit. By 6pm it was 30 degrees. It never rose above freezing for months! BBBrrrrrrr!!

Like 
3 Members
like this post.
Login to Like.

"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
Harvey

I think, therefore I am - I think!

03 Aug 2022
06:37:15pm

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

Ian, Northern Alberta is damn cold. I had a friend who worked in Fort McMurray and told me stories. She worked in a little guard shack and it was heated by propane. According to her propane will not flow in temperatures under -40C and I guess she had many cold shifts. I lived in Edmonton for a while and worked part time in a meat packing plant on night clean up. After using a high pressure hose if you had to go outside for any reason your clothing would freeze almost immediately. You went outside as seldom as possible. I used to sneak out for a few minutes at about 2:00 AM to watch the sun come up even though it only went down at 11:00 PM. It's totally different living in areas like that!!! Most people don't truly understand the concept of "cold". Even in Edmonton, which is not that far up North, there were weeks where it never got warmer than -20C, a face covering if it was windy was a necessity!

Like 
2 Members
like this post.
Login to Like.

""When it rains, look for rainbows; when it's dark, look for stars." Oscar Wilde "
Members Picture
Brechinite

Neddie Seagoon from The Telegoons
04 Aug 2022
10:40:47am

Auctions - Approvals

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

AAHH! Edmonton.

Edmonton in July.....Klondyke Days!

Where we were the RCMP carried two pistols in the winter. Why? They couldn't reload their first gun due to the cold!

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Gonnae no dae that!..........Just gonnae no!"
Members Picture
Bobstamp

04 Aug 2022
08:11:06pm

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

We Ingrahams (I, Susan, and Paul, then a baby) moved to Prince George, BC in 1973, where I would begin my teaching career after a short-lived attempt to be a journalist. We moved into a trailer (a "mobile home") just a quarter mile from the school where I would teach Grade 7. We enjoyed the autumn (lots of bright yellow birch leaves and crisp, clear air, and then winter arrived. We weren't new to Canada's winters — we had lived for a couple of years in Ottawa, which tried to mimic the last Ice Age. Prince George's winter was something else again. Most days were not just liveable, but enjoyable. We snowshoed, took up cross-country skiing, and spent some happy Sunday afternoons on a large toboggan that we bought. But then winter — real Prince George winter! — arrived, bringing temperatures lower than I thought temperatures could go.

On the first day of our first Prince George "cold snap," I set out for my school on foot, warmly dressed in a puffy ski jacket, long johns, heavy mittens, and a WWII Arctic-issue cap complete with a plush-lined strap to keep my nose warm. I got perhaps 20 metres from our trailer when my nose started freezing shut with each breath. My eyes started watering, and tears froze on my eyelids. I did survive my walk to my school. My principal told me that he had to call a tow truck that morning to get his car into a garage to warm when. When it was towed away from his house, its wheels weren't turning.

Over the next few days, the pipes underneath our trailer froze, and I unfroze them, carefully, with a blowtorch, while trying to avoid frozen cobwebs and incinerating the trailer. Our fuel-oil heater ran pretty much full time; later that winter a heater serviceman discovered that the heater's chimney was askew, and might have asphyxiated us in our sleep!

I was concerned about the oil supply in our Jeep Wagoneer, and decided to "top it up". The oil, in cans which you punctured with a spout, was stored in a garden shed. I punctured a can of winter-weight oil and tried to empty it. It wasn't emptying. I pulled the can up to see if the spout was clogged, and it was. With oil. Frozen oil. Frozen oil with oil crystals in it, hanging in a blob from the spout. Note to self: Don't store motor oil in the garden shed in the winter. Further note to self: Install circulating block heater in Jeep.

We got a LOT of snow that winter. A record snowfall. By the time spring arrived, officially, we had 3.7 metres of snow on the ground. That's 12 feet, for you Americans. I'd often had to go up on the trailer's roof to shovel snow off, lest it collapse. Our trailer was surrounded by a nice wooden fence, with a large wooden gate. The fence and gait were covered with snow. A neighbour up the street, who own a front-end loader, offered to clear the snow from our driveway for $5. That's was bargain. Or would have been. We were watching when he began working. He drove his front-end loader right at the right side of the gate, which was invisible, but he found it, but not until he raised the scoop, which was filled with snow, and launched large pieces of the fence and gait into the air. He didn't charge us. In fact, he stopped, thought about it, backed up, turned around, and drove home. He never again offered to help, and didn't dare ask for payment. We never again asked him for help!

A couple of years later, we bought a house within bicycling distance of my school, and Prince George was still have severe winters. Here are two photos of our house in the snow. That's me on the roof, and Susan shovelling the snow that I'd already shovelled off the roof:

Image Not Found

Image Not Found

In 2000, both Susan and I retired, and moved to Vancouver, where our son was living, and still lives. We had snow for a couple of days this winter, and a lot of rain. You don't have to shovel rain.

Bob





Like 
5 Members
like this post.
Login to Like.

www.ephemeraltreasur ...
Members Picture
DannyS

05 Aug 2022
04:45:37am

re: Many thanks to those who do this!!

I think I became allergic to cold weather in my twenties. After that I would only do jobs in warm places like Africa, Southern Europe, the Middle East, Australia and tropical Asia. There was plenty of oil work in Alaska but it didn't tempt me. I started off with a couple of years in the North Sea and decided I never wanted to go back there. Today I saw a Facebook post from a retired Finnish sea captain I know. He now lives in the Philippines. Here it is.

"I worked in the North Seas, Baltic seas and Gulf of Finland from 1966 to 1970 Never Seismic, product tankers and cargo vls.
THE NORTH SEA SEPARETE THE BOYS FROM THE MEN. THE BOYS U CAN FOOL TO STAY. THE MEN KEEP CLEAR."

Ian, I enjoyed working in the summer in Aberdeen, the Orkneys and the Western Isles, but I never enjoyed Peterhead or the ShetlandsHappy

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
        

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