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Oceania/Australia : Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
16 Nov 2021
06:37:21pm
1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra with OS puncture. Strip of 3 showing dry ink on left stamp, rare and currently unlisted.

Only 2 are known to exist in a strip of 3 stamps as the dry-ink pair originated from a block of 6 stamps that were eventually separated in 2 strips of 3. A remarkable specimen of dry inking from the KGV era.

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Rob



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"Specialised Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
amsd
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Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
17 Nov 2021
11:25:39am

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re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

can you explain how one of three is dry-inked. I am unfamiliar with the term or the process and, therefore, how it could co-exist with something else.

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
17 Nov 2021
12:03:39pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

" ... can you explain how one of three is dry-inked ..."

My first thought is that it is like a "dry Martini" mostly in the eye of the beholder. However, in the printing process the ink is, of course, wet, and the
paper dampened. Sometimes all or a part of the paper is not sufficiently dampened
and the result is called a dry print.
Summarizing a longer explanation from "This is Philately" by Ken Wood, vol 1

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
17 Nov 2021
04:47:25pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi amsd and cdj1122

Dry inking is when the doctor blade which wipes excess ink from the plates is either too close to the plates and ends up wiping too much ink off leaving an area of the plate with very little to no ink, or that the ink mixture and heating was incorrect causing the ink to be thick and the ink sticks to the doctor blade which causes the same effect.

Here is a strip of 8 showing extensive dry inking progressing extensively across the first 3 stamps on the left leaving the last stamp nearly obliterated.

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musicman
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APS #213005
17 Nov 2021
06:54:36pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

So, are these examples considered errors or freaks?

They were made this way in error, but it makes them freaks compared to the 'norm'.


Confused

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Rob1956
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17 Nov 2021
08:04:01pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi musicman

The dry ink is a variety not an error or a freak.

An error is normally seen on one sheet, it may be a single stamp or a few stamps caused by a damaged plate or wrong ink applied for example to the sheet.

A variety is constant and can be found on a few sheets to many sheets. A freak is a term not really used in Australia as it gives a wide birth to the definition of what makes the stamp(s) different, though I do hear that term at times at the club I attend, it's a word I tend not to use to identify an error or variety.

Rob

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
19 Nov 2021
10:58:47am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

" .. . . An error is normally seen on one sheet . . . '

I don't know Rob, but I think your definition seems too restrictive.
I am sure it would be a surprise to the members of the "Errors, Freaks and Oddities Club.
In an article John Hotchner, the retired president of the EFOC writes;

" ... . . .. Errors are defined as a major mistake that’s repeatable. The standard reference in the philatelic hobby, the Scott Catalogue, lists errors such as missing perforations that affect a whole side of a stamp, either vertically or horizontally.
Freaks are defined as minor variations, where the perforations are only partially missing, for example. They are not listed in Scott, and though freaks often display the same effect as errors, they’re slightly different in each instance.
Oddities are examples that don’t fit in the other two categories. Test stamps, for instance, were printed to test dispensing machines. They were never meant for public distribution. There are a couple of other examples, such as stamps on which no design has been printed or where the perforations were made for one format, say for coils (rolls of stamps), but then the stamps were actually used in booklets, so it looks like a misperforation but it really isn’t. It’s not a freak; it’s an oddity. .. . . . . "

And the Warwick and Warwick website explains;
Errors: Error stamps have serious visual mistakes that are repeatable, which have come about because of a failure at some stage in the printing process. This means the stamps do not appear as intended and, as a result, are very scarce.
Freaks: Freaks have minor variations or less serious defects, caused by a one-time error in the stamp production process, which make the stamp unusable. Unlike major errors, which are much more desirable to collectors, they do not massively boost the value of a stamp although the most visually striking examples are worth a little bit more. . . . . "

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
19 Nov 2021
08:26:56pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi

As I previously mentioned "freaks" is a term mainly used in America. Even though it is sometimes used here it is not a common philatelic terminology. Also I have errors and all have been located only on 1 sheet, and although I have a variety that is recognized as the only one found, it would not have been the only variety of it's kind in the original printing.

For instance the 1959 blue 5d with the left side imperforated between the stamp and sheet margin was found only on 1 sheet, only 10 exist, this is known as an error.

An "oddity" to us is a stamp that is different to regular stamps, that includes errors and varieties, "oddities" also is not a common word we use.

The British auctioneers Warwick and Warwick are using an American definition as to what an error is. Here in Australia, the philatelic terminology is more defined when using the terms "error" and "variety".

I believe John Hotchner is an American and obviously would use the American terms when identifying stamps.

The information you provided is quite interesting and allows me to see the insight of American philatelic terminologies.

Rob


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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
22 Nov 2021
03:31:34am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

".. . . An error is normally seen on one sheet . . "

Somehow I have trouble believing that American and British linguistics
have diverged so much from Australian that the phrase for an error, such
as naming the one wrong volcano or leaving the national title off a block
of four that may exist multiple times on each and every sheet (or even
every pane) of a multi thousand sheet printing is equal to "One Sheet"
and I suppose, one stamp, in Australia.
It reminds me of an almost empty box of Whitman's Chocolates and one
of the kids standing there saying, "But I only took one."

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
22 Nov 2021
10:41:20am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi

I have been collecting rarities for a few decades and have learnt many things about Australian rarities and philatelic terminology. I know some people in a forum using that term but it isn't really a common part of the Australian philatelic language.

The ACSC does not use that term nor the club I attend (Commonwealth Collector's Club of NSW), and I do not believe I have ever heard of the word "freak" being used at the club.

I do not know what US catalogues or collectors say about a rare stamp, but from reliable sources an error can only occur on one sheet and a variety is constant, occurring on multiple sheets.

Every error I have had only been found on one sheet, and the varieties I have have been found on a few sheets.

I am going to research on US philatelic terms so I can be more informed as well as comparing what the term "rare" and "freak" means from both the US, British and Australian side.

Rob

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
23 Nov 2021
01:04:58am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

".. . . An error is normally seen on one sheet . . "

So then the misnamed Australian volcano error only refers
to the first sheet, the other five or ten thousand sheets
with the same misnamed volcano are varieties ?
Is that first sheet with the "error" the first one noticed
or the sheet at the top of the pile. Or was the error in the
first annual commemorative book inspected for mistakes in the
printing process and the rest of the books with the mistake
all simply common garden varieties?
That seems to be an interesting dichotomy.

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Rob1956
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25 Nov 2021
04:17:57am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi

All my errors have come from one sheet and all my varieties are from multiple sheets. I have an error that only 9 exist and they came from one sheet, yet the varieties I have are still on the market.

For instance, a cracked plate is a variety if a few or many sheets would have been printed before it was discovered and replaced.

“So then the misnamed Australian volcano error only refers to the first sheet, the other five or ten thousand sheets with the same misnamed volcano are varieties?“ No, it does not; the first sheet would also be a variety along with the other five to ten thousand sheets. If the flaw is only discovered on one sheet and on no other, it will be classified as an error. If the same flaw is located on multiple sheets it is then identified as a variety.

There is no contradiction in what I say; it’s all quite simple in Australia when it comes to errors and varieties.

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
26 Nov 2021
12:16:21am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

That's interesting.
What happens when while sorting through an old album,
someone finds a misprint, heretofore unnoticed or proclaimed.

Another collector on a different continent has saved several
examples of that issue for future study as there seemed to
be something different. One rainy afternoon he, or she, discovers
that one of his stamps has an example of what eventually turns
out to be that misprinting.
Each, in separate auctions offers, and unknown to the other
offers his example as a rare, and possibly unique error of
some dollar significance.
Both stamps are sold either privately or at auctions for a
premium price.
Which of these otherwise virtually identical misprinted stamps
is correctly described ?
.
Carrying things just a bit further:
What would happen if a few years later each new owner decided
to cash in on whatever increased value his "unique" error stamp
is then worth and they are both offered in different auctions
and . sold.
(Let's say that all this took place in the and ink era, and it
is only due to the recent availability of computers, scanners
and access to the world wide web that the situation came to light.)
How would you decide, as an avowed expert in these issues, who
wins the title of "Rare Error" and who has to settle a lawsuit,
for mis-describing his stamp as an "error" when it was only a
Variety" ?

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
26 Nov 2021
01:39:33am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

There have been cases where a stamp was sold as unique at an auction in Sydney and another was sold in Victoria as unique the next day, it happens. I have a block of four 1949 ½d kangaroos with a very early state of plate crack, it is even mentioned in the ACSC as the only one cited, so as far as anyone is concerned it is the only one to date.

But we all know there is no such thing as a single cracked plate variety, as there would be more than one sheet printed, but until another is found it is ‘unique’.

I have a green tinted 1951 KGVI stamp, only 30 exist, these stamps were found only on one sheet. I have a Queen Victorian stamp with a red OS in a tilted position and inverted watermark; it is certified as the only error of its kind in existence.

Every single rare stamp I have that is certified as an error has been cited by the expertiser as being found on one sheet only.
If there was a lawsuit I would easily win as I would have expert certifiers and stamp specialists subpoenaed to back my claim.

You may see it differently in America and some people here may see it the same way, but there is a reason why some flaws are called “errors” and other flaws are called “varieties”.

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
27 Nov 2021
06:46:27pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

" . . If there was a lawsuit I would easily win
as I would have expert certifiers and stamp
specialists subpoenaed to back my claim. . . "


I doubt that, in the scenario I constructed,
if one were found to have been discovered to
be from an earlier print run whether tried
in London, Sidney or Timbuctoo using your
definition. You might not be personally
liable, unless you had personally guaranteed
it to be the single unique error example.
But then no one in London or Timbuctoo, or even
Sidney would rely on your restrictive definition.

" . . Every single rare stamp I have that is certified
as an error has been cited by the expertiser as being
found on one sheet only.. . . "


That may be, but does not explain what would
happen if a second copy were found, or better,
how then would you be able to guarantee the
second one discovered was not actually from
the first sheet printed, barring some extensive
plating or two serendipitous plate numbers
attached ?

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".... You may think you understood what you thought I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you think you heard is not what I thought I meant. .... "
Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
27 Nov 2021
08:03:53pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Quote:

"That may be, but does not explain what would happen if a second copy were found, or better, how then would you be able to guarantee the second one discovered was not actually from the first sheet printed, barring some extensive plating or two serendipitous plate numbers attached?"



If a second copy was found it would have obviously come from the same sheet. I have never seen a second stamp with exactly the same error found on a different sheet in the 45 years I have been studying and collecting errors and varieties. If say, one did occur on another sheet, then it would show me and the expertisers wrong and a major reassessment of what we know as an error would be in order, but that if is just an if.

Quote:

"I doubt that, in the scenario I constructed, if one were found to have been discovered to be from an earlier print run whether tried in London, Sidney or Timbuctoo using your definition. You might not be personally liable, unless you had personally guaranteed it to be the single unique error example. But then no one in London or Timbuctoo, or even Sidney would rely on your restrictive definition."



My interpretation of error vs variety is from discussing the matter personally with Australia's top expertisers and stamp specialists (not the common run-of-the-mill local stamp dealer) over the years. My information is personally guaranteed and in writing as well by expertisers and specialists, so I have no fear of being dragged over the coals with my interpretation between an error and a variety.

I wouldn't know how London or Timbuctoo would respond to what I say, but I can assure you that Sydney does rely on my definition which is the same definition of Australia's national and international expertisers and specialists.


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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
27 Nov 2021
09:09:05pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

" ... s the same definition of Australia's national and
international expertisers and specialists. ..."

Is that definition printed somewhere ?
I did try a search for the words you used
but did not get that response.
I would not have belabored the subject.
Perhaps I missed them.

" ... I have never seen a second stamp with exactly the same error found on a different sheet in the 45 years I have been studying and collecting errors and varieties. ..."

Well here is something to fit into your definition.
" .The Dag Hammarskjöld invert is a 4 cent value postage stamp error issued on 23 October 1962 by the United States Postal Service (then known as the Post Office Department) one year after the death of Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations, in an airplane crash.
Nature of rarity: Invert error
Date of production: 23 October 1962
Face value: 4 US cents
source )

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".... You may think you understood what you thought I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you think you heard is not what I thought I meant. .... "
Rob1956
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27 Nov 2021
10:39:13pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

It's on my certificates and you need to converse with an Australian specialist. It will not be on the internet.

An error is found on a single sheet.

Errors in my collection.

1949 yellow-orange kangaroo. 160 from the only known sheet.
1951 KGVI on green tinted paper. 30 from the only known sheet.
1959 QEII imperforate at left between stamp and sheet margin. Only 1 of vertical strip of 9 discovered.
1935 ANZAC 1/- Plate Proof. Only 1 sheet of 120 exist.
1889 QV red OS overprint tilted, only one known to exist in any condition.
1965 £2 Navigator specimen with overprint in central position. 29 sheets of 120 stamps with the regular overprint at bottom right position printed, only 1 sheet known to exist with the overprint in central position, all originally placed into collectors packs.

You are trying to compare an American philatelic terminology of a 'freak' or 'oddity' with an Australian definition that separates errors from varieties, in which case you refer to it as being 'restrictive'.

It's better to be restrictive than to give a definition that does not explain anything. I would rather have a certificate that is very detailed than one that uses a generic term to describe the error or variety.

Varieties can be far more expensive to buy than an error, and rarer. I know, I have some. We can discuss this like a tennis match but it all comes down to two things, an error and a variety, and in my opinion calling them a 'freak' or 'oddity' deprives the stamp the status it deserves in the world of philately.




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angore
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Collector, Moderator
28 Nov 2021
05:45:54am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

As I understand the Aussie definition, as an example, if I had a stamp from the only known sheet of the inverted $1 Candlestick (Scott 1610c) aka "CIA error", it is called an error. If a second sheet was discovered later, does the definition changes to a variety?

If an issue is printed more than 1 up (meaning say a larger pane cut down to small panes after printing) does the definition apply to the press sheet or the individual sheets.




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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
28 Nov 2021
11:31:18am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi angore

If one other is found on another sheet the second stamp would not have exactly the same error there would be a difference, all identical errors only occurs on one sheet.

Quote:

"If an issue is printed more than 1 up (meaning say a larger pane cut down to small panes after printing) does the definition apply to the press sheet or the individual sheets."


That is irrelevant to the discussion referring to errors.

It seems the responses here do not fathom what an error is. Buy a major error (not one of those ridiculous fly speck "errors") and try and find another on another sheet.
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musicman
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APS #213005
28 Nov 2021
12:34:47pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Quote:

"It seems the responses here do not fathom what an error is."




Or at least, the AUSTRALIAN definition of an error, as you have stated that neither Gr. Britain nor the US (maybe even Timbuktu!) incorporate the same definition as - per your words - the ACSC, the CCC of NSW, the city of Sydney and the whole of the nation of Australia.

Australia seems to be one-of-a-kind when it comes to the discussed terminology.

Quote:

"it’s all quite simple in Australia when it comes to errors and varietie"

s.

It would seem we should agree to disagree....and that is okayHappy.

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Rob1956
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28 Nov 2021
03:57:45pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Quote:

"Or at least, the AUSTRALIAN definition of an error, as you have stated that neither Gr. Britain nor the US (maybe even Timbuktu!) incorporate the same definition as - per your words - the ACSC, the CCC of NSW, the city of Sydney and the whole of the nation of Australia.

Australia seems to be one-of-a-kind when it comes to the discussed terminology."


It seems to be from the responses.

Quote:

"It would seem we should agree to disagree....and that is okay"


There is no need to agree to disagree, as I said earlier, to prove a point, just buy a major error and see if one other is found on another sheet.


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musicman
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APS #213005
28 Nov 2021
09:38:00pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

So be it.

Yawn

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Rob1956
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28 Nov 2021
11:50:26pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Yawning is a sign that people do when they cannot understand the subject and become bored of it. All you need to do to prove me wrong is to obtain a major error and try and find another of its kind from a different sheet. I have a few major errors and I cannot find another on a different sheet and I have had some of these rare stamps for many years.

So I'll call it a day hoping that you and angore may one day understand what the definition of an error is.

Thanks for the feedback.

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Laeding
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29 Nov 2021
12:22:57am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

I believe the "yawn" is more of a gesture saying "this will simply keep going on as each party believes in his/her definition and isn't going to be moved anytime soon." I understand what each of you are saying, but am not interested in getting in anyone's crosshairs! That being said, it is interesting to learn about how others define things, but I don't believe it is worth "arguing" over in a forum designed to both enlighten those at every level of collecting, and hopefully bring new members into the fold.

Years ago at a stamp show "after hours" there was a lively discussion about calling stamps/covers "scarce" or "rare" in auction listings, and the qualifications to be listed as such. Two in attendance were very well-known auctioneers, with another working for another popular house -- all good friends. I don't recall the items being discussed, but someone chimed in with the known population of whatever one of the stamps was, and simply said something along the lines of: "list it as 1 of X number known, and say it's a pain in the ass to find!"


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DaveSheridan
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29 Nov 2021
12:47:57am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

I've always used these definitions:

This is an error, a random ink blob (in the US you would call this a freak)

Image Not Found

Another error, which the US may call an oddity

Image Not Found

This is a variety, which may appear once on every sheet or pane of the issue until it's corrected (detached triangle at top left)

Image Not Found




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angore
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Collector, Moderator
29 Nov 2021
06:09:00am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Like other terms in philately, there is not always one definition for the same word in different regions. It is just important to know there is a difference when speaking to those that use different definitions.

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
30 Nov 2021
06:36:56am
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

" ... there is not always one definition for
the same word in different regions..."

That is right and was never in doubt.
Rob surely proved that there are many issues
that met that restrictive standard. HUZZAR !
I wish I had not offered a hypothetical. It
was confusing to the casual reader and only
clouded the discussion.

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Horamakhet
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30 Nov 2021
05:12:11pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi to all,

Just to through the dog to the crocodile.

We have the contrived & post office created error in the 2020 collections.

To me, that is not even a variety, but we have persons trying to make it a important discovery and comparing it with a major British error.

I agree with Rob, if you find or buy something as spectacular as what he owns, you definitely need to have a certificate. Collectors and I hate to say it, investors these days want authoritative proof that they have something unique or unusual.

I have owned or own, as do many of us, varieties and I would always get them authenticated due to the fact that there are so many persons forging stamps these days as technology makes it very easy.

Mind you I would not go to the extreme of Arthur Hind, who once owned the British Guiana rarity, and when another was found, he bought it and then burnt it.

Most large dealers in Australia will always ask if you have a recognized certificate for any error, and or a major variety.

In Australia, we do not have an abundance of persons that certify the validity of errors or varities, but those that do are well known and highly regarded in their fields, and their expertise can and does ensure that if the item ever comes to auction or for sale that the item will sell for more than it would without a certificate.
Documents in Australia are not allowed to be mis-leading or false, and I have yet to hear of a case where a certificate of an Australian Authority has ever been challenged in court.



Regards

Franz


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Rob1956
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30 Nov 2021
08:45:33pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

The stamps posted by DaveSheridan.

The diagonal crease is an error, I admit, but the type of error not classified as a fault as it was most likely caused by part of the paper overlapping and then printed on, it didn't create anything significant such as causing one or more sides of the stamp being imperforate, so it is not the type of error discussed her, it's just a fold that creased the paper but the stamp is not touched.

It seems none are errors. The ink-blob is a variety, I’ve seen many stamps with such blobs, they’re interesting to look at but doesn’t rate as an error.

As I said before, using the word "freak" may be the word that answers all in the US but where I am we like to be a little more detailed, so "freak" is not a favoured word. Even I use the word 'oddity" but I explain what that oddity is.

The diagonal crease is not an error; it most likely was folded over when it was manually fed into a printer. This was not created via the printing process, so calling it an error is not correct. Proof of this is the perforations, design, in fact the entire stamp, it is perfect in every detail, if it were an error the stamp would show major interference, such as the stamp being imperforated on one or more sides, part of the design is missing for example, now that would be an error of significance.

I cannot say only one sheet had this fold or there were others, but it is not the type of error discussed here, I would say a minor “variety”, nothing of significance.

Victorian stamps are notorious with varieties such as this; it’s common and will likely be on a few sheets and denominations.

An example of an actual error showing the vertical middle being imperforate from the QV era, you have the brown ½d blot variety.

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
30 Nov 2021
08:54:41pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Quote:

"Like other terms in philately, there is not always one definition for the same word in different regions. It is just important to know there is a difference when speaking to those that use different definitions."


There is only one definition for the one flaw, as I said I have heard the word “freak” and “oddity” used by collectors, but when it comes to identifying the “oddity” or “freak” one must be able to describe the term to set it apart from varieties and vice versa that are also placed in the “freak” category.

In every certificate I have it defines the category and status of the stamp. None are referred to as a “freak” or “oddity” it is too generic. Also all the errors I have that are certified, all are found on a single sheet, no other.

Plate cracks are varieties, they are found from sheets not from a single sheet.

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Rob1956
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30 Nov 2021
09:06:44pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Quote:

"That is right and was never in doubt. Rob surely proved that there are many issues that met that restrictive standard. HUZZAR !
I wish I had not offered a hypothetical. It was confusing to the casual reader and only clouded the discussion."



I do not understand why you refer to a definition of a flaw as restrictive; it is not, when going to auction or to be sold privately it helps with the sale of the item/s as it describes what they are purchasing.

I would find it a simplistic certificate if it said “freak” or “oddity”, that would be restrictive as it does not go further in describing exactly what that “freak” or “oddity” is, though I do admit I also use the word “oddity” but I also mention what that oddity is and what definition it applies to “error” or “variety”.

Your hypothetical was not confusing and it didn't cloud anything, it just wasn't a good one to describe what you were trying to say.
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DaveSheridan
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30 Nov 2021
09:41:29pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

We'll have to agree to disagree Rob.

A variety is constant, an error isn't. Ink blobs, missing colours etc are errors.

The "creased" Falkland Islands, which is most definitely an error and recognised as such, with the War Stamp overprint on the reverse is far from "nothing of significance". It is a significant Falklands error, and I sold this at Grosvenor Auction in London (June 2012, Auction 73, lot 535) for £700.

The Cyprus detached triangle is also a significant variety, which appears on the key plate used by a number of countries. This particular example, SG16ab, catalogues at £275.

Methinks you need to broaden horizons outside of the Australian view.

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
30 Nov 2021
10:07:05pm
re: Rare 1928 International Philatelic Exhibition 3d blue kookaburra dry inking

Hi Franz

When I buy a stamp, and it isn’t the first time I had spent many hundreds to thousands of dollars for a single, pair, block, strip etc., I would like to know what I am buying for that amount of money, whether the item is a variety or an error.

The 2020 manufactured “error” was to boost what was a failing yearly PO album and it worked, and people like “He Who Must Not Be Named” with his personal greed increased the interest in the manufactured “error”.

Even though you can still buy the album at the post office, he is selling them at nearly twice the amount that the post office is selling the album for, and the gullible are still buying the album from him.

You’re correct, my stamps are not the garden variety and the certificates must be in detail or I will not buy the stamp.

The only person in Australian and the only expertiser that has a recognised international status is Chris Ceremuga, and only one of two expertisers I will use, the other being Mike Drury.

A well written and precise document will increase the public interest in the item and also the value of the item, using “freak” or Oddity” on a certificate will not have the same effect.

Quote:

"Most large dealers in Australia will always ask if you have a recognized certificate for any error, and or a major variety."


That’s true.

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