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Latin America/All : DWI postage specialties

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pigdoc
17 Dec 2020
06:01:00pm
I'm going to start this new thread off with edited content copied from an older thread. This was posted by one of our members, Tony Gade (aka Holstein2007), who is a Danish West Indies specialist:

Quote:

"I have also made a website about bisected 4 cents from DWI.
Commmet is much requested."



You can see this content at:
DWI Bisected 4 Cent Stamp Usage in 1903
It is the most comprehensive work I have yet seen on the subject.

Here is an item from my collection:
Image Not Found
Your close observation will reveal that this is a bisect of an inverted frame stamp, most probably from position 91-100 of the Third Issue. It is a philatelic cover, as witnessed by the lack of an addressee. Tony estimates that only about 10,000 4c bisects were used. Since some number less than 11% of this issue have inverted frames, this cover is one of less than 1100 with an inverted frame. That's presuming that the probability of an inverted bisect on cover is identical to the prevalence of inverted frames in the stamp issue. One of the more interesting facts is that inverted frames were not discovered until 1917, so there would have been no propensity among collectors to specifically create covers using stamps with inverted frames.

Again, from Tony's research on the period of usage published on the website, 4c bisect usage began on January 20, 1903. So, this is also an early cover from the bisect period, which lasted until March 1, 1903.

Enjoy!
-Paul
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pigdoc
25 Jan 2021
09:04:02pm
re: DWI postage specialties

Lately, I've been doing a deep, DEEP dive into the Danish West Indies "bi-colors".

Here are a pair of Sc 6 (high-res image substituted):
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There were 8 printings of this stamp between 1874 and 1895 that were perforated 14x13.5 as these two are.

The stamp on the left is from the first printing, printed 15 January 1874, earliest recorded postmark 15 August 1874. It is printed on thin paper (less than 0.0024"). The solid background portions of the oval have a gridded appearance, just barely discernable in this scan, but quite obvious under magnification. This is characteristic of the first printing. Other distinguishing features are the colors, and the shape of the end of the central plume of the feather at the lower left, Main Frame Group 3.

The stamp on the right is very distinctive. It is from the second printing, printed 18 March 1876, earliest recorded postmark 15 December 1877. It is also printed on the thin paper. Most of the frame cliches of this printing were the "thick" frame which is fairly easily seen on this stamp. There are 3 features that characterize the thick frame, including again, the shape of the plume of the feather in the lower left. The colors of this printing are quite distinctive - strong rose carmine and pale sky blue.

Both stamps have the "normal" (not inverted) frame and the 5-ring cancel with a central dot, which was the earliest and most common cancel, on St. Thomas and St. Croix. The central dot is very faint on the left stamp, but there were no other 5-ring cancels.

I have another couple dozen of these 3 Cent stamps yet to examine closely for varieties.

Enjoy!
-Paul


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pigdoc
26 Jan 2021
02:59:55pm
re: DWI postage specialties

Continuing the search and identification...

This time, I spent some time to figure out how to scan at 1200dpi, which is necessary to see the finer details:
Image Not Found

Now THAT's more like it! Much better resolution! (Details on how I scanned this image, below.)
Anyway, to the stamps.
The stamp on the left is from Printing 8, printed on 18 April 1895, earliest known postmark 28 November 1896. The printing is easily determined from the color (rose red with greenish blue frame). The greenish color of the frame is unmistakable under magnification and unique to this printing. The stamp is printed on thick (0.003") paper, which fits with its 1895 printing date. The central plume of the feather in the upper right corner is shaped like a club, making it Major Frame Group 5, and Printing 8 was the only printing to use this frame, and to be perforated 14x13.5.This stamp has an inverted frame, as did 99 of the 100 stamps on the panes of Printing 8. Incidentally, this stamp also has the documented Oval Flaw 3 which is that short white line extending from the bottom of the "S" in CENTS. That flaw is only to be found in position 31 of the panes of this printing! That makes this stamp one of only 2000 printed.

Now, for the mystery stamp.
The stamp on the right is also medium to thick paper (0.0029") but clearly, the colors are slightly different (dull dark red with a gray blue frame?). There is clearly no greenish cast to the frame color. But, do you see that tiny red line in the outer frame at the bottom, under the "CE" of CENTS? That's a known flaw of printing 8, position #91, which is also the position of the one normal frame stamp of Printing 8. I'm thinking this is a flaw not fully described in Sorensen (the reference I'm using). It's hard to see the shape of the central plume of the feather in the lower left corner, but it looks to me like it's not club-shaped, but is blunt, like Major Frame Group 4. The color descriptions that I used are for Printing 6, which uses Major Frame Group 4. More research is needed! laeding, you better weigh in on this one!

Both stamps have the later, sans Serif cancellations. The year-date in the cancel on the stamp on the left looks like "1900".

For the DWI 3c, Printings 1, 2, 7, and 8 are fairly easy to identify. Printings 3, 4, 5, and 6 are much more challenging. I need to get Nielsen's 2001 reference book - a 6-volume set!

And now, here's the process I used for making the scan in this message:
1. Open "Windows Fax and Scan"
2. Select "New Scan"
3. Create a custom Profile: bitmap image, 1200dpi.
4. Scan.
5. Click "File", then "Open". (Opens image in Windows Photo Viewer. It's too big to open in Windows Paint.)
6. Click "Edit" under "Edit & Create" in Windows Photo Viewer.
7. Crop .bmp scan by dragging frame.
8. Save cropped scan (default is the Scanned Documents folder).
9. Open saved, cropped scan in Windows Paint.
10. Resize image to 50% in Windows Paint.
11. Save resized image as .jpg (SOR will not allow anything but a .jpg upload)
12. Upload to SOR!

And now, I'm going to rescan last night's image!

Enjoy!
-Paul

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Laeding
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13 Feb 2021
05:11:21pm
re: DWI postage specialties

Here are copies of the Normal Frames (position 50) from Printing VIII from the Danish West Indies. There were 200 sheets of 100 printed, thus only 200 copies can exist. Facit 17bv1, Scott 19a.



Image Not Found

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Laeding
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13 Feb 2021
05:47:42pm
re: DWI postage specialties

Here's a copy of Danish West Indies #4, the 4 Cent "classic" issue having the "3" Lübeck numeral cancel. I've seen a copy with the "1" Copenhagen cancel, but not the Lübeck, which even on a Danish stamp is quite hard to find. This example has very nice centering and perfs for the issue, and the majority of canceled examples were fiscally canceled.


Image Not Found

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Laeding
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20 Feb 2021
02:17:38pm
re: DWI postage specialties

Below are copies of Facit 23bv1 (Scott 14c) with the inverted frame and 23bv3 (Scott 14b), the "double overprint," from the Danish West Indies. The inverted frame is found in 23 of 100 positions in the 2nd printing (the 1st printing didn't have inverted frames).

The overprints were struck by hand and can be found in both printings (not noted in Scott). The "double overprints" are a challenge to find, but not impossible. Sometimes the doubling is subtle, and others it is impossible to miss. This one is somewhere in the middle. In the right-hand margin, it appears that it may have been just lightly touched by the hand stamp, potentially making this example a "weak" "1 CENT 1" variety -- someday I'll send it in for certification and find out for certain.

Should you have copies of this overprint, take a close look for doubling!

Image Not Found

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