What we collect!
Stamporama Discussion Board Logo
For People Who Love To Talk About Stamps


58 visitors online

Oceania/Australia : 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

AuthorPostings
Rob1956
Members Picture
Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
11 Mar 2019
07:50:21pm
Image Not Found

There is no documented information of this unusual variety showing majority of stamp extensively over-inked, this is the only stamp of this nature cited, there is no doubt others exist but to date no other has been located.

Rob

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.

"Specialist Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
Horamakhet
11 Mar 2019
11:35:47pm
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Rob

I like it, Must have gone ten rounds with Mohammed Ali, and then another ten with Mike Tyson, and some cage fighting as well lol

Horamakhet

Like
Login to Like
this post
Horamakhet
12 Mar 2019
12:15:36am
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Rob

Can't remember if you said that this stamp has a thin paper variety.

Could these two be thin paper.?

Bottom stamp, right eye, when first punch was landed,

Image Not Found

Image Not Found

Regards
Horamakhet

Like
Login to Like
this post
Rob1956
Members Picture
Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
12 Mar 2019
02:41:25am
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Horamakhet

There is a thin paper variety (ACSC 230aa), the paper has to be 0.075mm or less, the left looks a little more transparent than the right but it doesn't mean that either is thin paper unless the paper thickness is measured. I will soon send the emus back as I am half-way looking for varieties.

I can see the dot in the right eye, or is it from the cancellation?

Rob

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Specialist Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
Horamakhet
12 Mar 2019
07:00:31am
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Rob

It is actually a red dot in the eye.

I am going to get a paper micrometer in the next few weeks.
Definitely some thing I need.

Your are correct, the left looks thinner.

Horamakhet

Like
Login to Like
this post
Rob1956
Members Picture
Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
12 Mar 2019
07:38:51am
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Horamakhet

It would be a wise investment. I'll soon email you where to get the one I have, the place is in Melbourne and it is under $100.

Rob

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Specialist Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
51Studebaker
Members Picture
Dialysis, damned if you do...dead if you don't
12 Mar 2019
08:26:02am
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

In my opinion micrometers require skill and experience to use properly; measuring thin materials like paper is not as simple as using, for example, a weight scale.
Having trained many QA inspectors in the use of measuring equipment, I found that learning to measure thin materials was among the hardest skills for folks to master. Going out to the thousands (or ten thousands) can be difficult for an inexperienced person and should also be done on a calibrated micrometer. (Micrometers should be calibrated every year.)
Don

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Current Score... Don 1 - Cancer 0"

stampsmarter.com
Horamakhet
12 Mar 2019
04:17:43pm
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi 51 Studebaker

Wise advice

I use a lot of equipment in Gemmology, and it needs to be very accurate.

As you said, it is not easy to measure something precisely, that comes with experience.





Horamakhet


Like
Login to Like
this post
Rob1956
Members Picture
Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
12 Mar 2019
04:24:20pm
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Don

A novice using a micrometer can find it challenging at first, and in some cases impossible to master; as a 33 year technician the use of different types of micrometers became part of the norm for me, at times members at the ACCC I attend use micrometers at the club.

It takes a lot of practice and some guidance to understand a digital micrometer, and yes, a yearly calibration is important to maintain accuracy.

Horamakhet in his professional field will probably find it easy to use a digital micrometer; or if he finds a little difficulty in using one there is a stamp specialist he can visit that will show him how to use it.

In my case some of my thin papers are worth thousands of dollars and to properly use a micrometer is important to make sure the stamp is indeed a thin paper.

Rob

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Specialist Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
51Studebaker
Members Picture
Dialysis, damned if you do...dead if you don't
12 Mar 2019
04:47:02pm
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Rob,
I have no concerns about your level of experience; my posts today (here and at SCF) were really meant for the ‘masses’. Folks who have less experience, may purchase something less the best quality equipment or binders, and then make decisions involving costly stamps.

Our online communities have thousands of viewers, many of whom never even post, who may read threads like this one and think, ‘gosh, I’ll go buy an inexpensive micrometer and measure this stamp which I think might be a thin paper’. Then armed with a confirmation bias, no feel or experience for measuring paper thicknesses, they will quickly convince themselves they can quit their day jobs.

Since some of us end up investing a LOT of time dealing with this kind of situation each week, I felt a bit of preemptive context might be helpful in these kinds of threads. Happy
Don

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Current Score... Don 1 - Cancer 0"

stampsmarter.com
Rob1956
Members Picture
Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
12 Mar 2019
07:21:55pm
re: 1942 2½d KGVI showing extensive over-inking of red ink

Hi Don

I believe my experience with stamps (and I have been helping collectors for 27 years) prove my level of experience is important to the average collector, even though it may not be of much concern to you.

And as an experienced user of various micrometers (some of mine are worth hundreds of dollars each) I use a $100 micrometer, and I have seen world experts at the ACCC use micrometers (the micrometers are not high end models, $85 - $100) accurately measure thin paper stamps, so to use "best quality equipment" really isn't necessary. Even the renowned Australian stamp experts Juzwin’s use an $87 micrometer.

People with less experience can build experience by joining a club or finding a dealer that uses a micrometer.

Quote:

"Our online communities have thousands of viewers, many of whom never even post, who may read threads like this one and think, ‘gosh, I’ll go buy an inexpensive micrometer and measure this stamp which I think might be a thin paper’. Then armed with a confirmation bias, no feel or experience for measuring paper thicknesses, they will quickly convince themselves they can quit their day jobs."



I have always mentioned that it takes a lot of practice to master a micrometer and if one uses the ACSC, many of the thin papers have the thickness in brackets such as "0.085mm or less", so to aim for that number or less will assure correct thickness measurements.

Any novice that goes out and buys a micrometer without understanding the use of one will find it impossible to measure the thickness of a stamp and can easily make a mistake of identifying a regular transparent paper with a transparent thin paper; this is why I ask people to send me the stamps in question to check for thickness if they are not sure themselves.

When you said “Since some of us end up investing a LOT of time dealing with this kind of situation each week, I felt a bit of preemptive context might be helpful in these kinds of threads” I invested 27 years helping people streamline their collections from the novice to the investor, and not once had anyone had to “pre-empt” any of my posts, although constructive criticism is always welcome.

If a novice buys a micrometer regardless of cost then that is the first step to serious collecting, the next step is to teach that novice how to properly use their micrometer.

With binders, that depends on the collector and the stamps in his/her collection. The late Arthur Gray had some of his collection in normal binders (not stamp binders, he collected stamps for over 60 years), his collection is up for auction and is expected to realise around the 28 million dollar mark.

I always instructed collectors to buy proper stamp albums, though some collectors may not be able to afford albums and opt temporarily for normal binders.

Rob

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Specialist Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
        
Please Note:
Postings that were loaded from the old Discussion Board cannot be edited.

Contact Webmaster | Visitors Online | Unsubscribe Emails


This site is provided by Roy Lingen at www.buckacover.com

User Agreement

Copyright © 2019 Stamporama.com