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General Philatelic/Supplies, Literature & Software : Storage and Display

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nranderson
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04 Feb 2019
01:35:12am
I inherited two stamp collections in the past year and have added to the storage systems that the former custodian of these stamps used. That is standard 3 ring binders of various sizes along with either see-through vinyl pages with about 9 equal sized "pockets on each side used primarily for stamps off of envelopes and bulk items. Other albums were binders but with various depth rows to accommodate vertical, horizontal or square issues. Finally the album the Harris Citation Stamp album. Now the second system bothers me. Stamps are just shoved down to the base of each there is no proper spacing and if you forget a country you're screwed! And turning pages is with caution and unknown results. Any fundamental do's and don'ts getting started? Thanks everyone you are all friendly to us new folks and always willing to help.






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angore
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Enjoying the little works of art
04 Feb 2019
06:44:51am
re: Storage and Display

How they are organized now?

Are they sorted by country in some specific order? It is not uncommon for collectors/hoarders to store spares in a separate collections and organization depends on collector.

The question is how do you want to organize them for display?

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"Stamp Collecting is a many splendored thing"
ikeyPikey
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04 Feb 2019
11:50:48am
re: Storage and Display

.
On the theory that you do not want to do it all twice, vinyl is not generally considered to be a proper archival material.

Q/ Were you using the word vinyl in a generic or specific sense?

Most folks organize by catalog number (which translates to by country and, then, more/less chronologically).

Any potential buyer will appreciate that system, as they will know where to look for the goodies.

But you get to be you.

Topical collectors would pull-out all of the stamps that pertain to their topic, for example.

Most collectors would segregate particular usages, putting all of the perfins & precancels & SOTNs & plate number singles & & & in their own binders.

It kinda depends on what you want to look at when you are looking for something else.

If you are looking for an Ajmani stamp with a horse on it, would you want to look at page after page of Ajmani stamps, or page after page of horse stamps?

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey (who was Twelve Years a Slave to Scott)

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BenFranklin1902
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Tom in Exton, PA
07 Feb 2019
07:10:57pm
re: Storage and Display

Image Not Found


It looks like the past owner used what he had available. The nine pocket pages are for sports cards. Probably ok quality for archive since they are used for valuable cards.

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ikeyPikey
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08 Feb 2019
09:32:19am
re: Storage and Display

.
They are not vinyl ... note the description on their website ... "PVC-free".

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey

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keesindy
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08 Feb 2019
11:40:24am
re: Storage and Display

I recently did a little research for a local historical society re conservation-quality sleeves for 3-ring binders. This was done quickly, but note that the use of terms such as "acid-free" and "archival quality" do not guarantee anything. I found only one 3-ring binder product (https://www.universityproducts.com/photo-album-pocket-pages.html) that is described thoroughly enough to be considered for conservation quality work. I suspect this is because most museum work involves box storage rather than 3-ring binder storage. Do your own due diligence.

Here are some informative links.

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/?fbclid=IwAR0aKVMY7KoyCR0gpkEA_7xa0xIwtyboGGFsdlkoQjlHPEn91Gav15rXWdg


And this one:

A technical publication by James M. Reilly of the Imaging Permanence Institute is devoted to color photography storage, but may be generally applicable.

That institute developed the standard P. A. T. test (Photographic Activity Test) for quantifying the actual "archival" and/or "acid-free" qualities of conservation type products. The P. A. T. test seems to be a reliable test for high-quality page protectors and other conservation products, but I'm not sure how widely used it is. Plus, P. A. T.-tested products are probably going to be more expensive.

Storage Guide for Color Photographic Materials

The attached image shows an excerpt from that publication. The full pdf document can be found here.

https://www.imagepermanenceinstitute.org/webfm_send/517

Image Not Found


And another source:

This is an excerpt.

Plastic Enclosures

Plastics work well in instances where it is important to be able to see an item while avoiding unnecessary handling, but not all plastics are safe for collections. Acetates can change dimension and enclosures made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) release harmful compounds that may affect the stability and appearance of collection materials. There are safe options, though. Preservation-grade polyester (often sold under the trade name Melinex) is the most stable, but polyethylene or polypropylene can also be used safely if they do not contain plasticizers.

When considering paper or plastic enclosures for photographs, choose materials that pass the Photographic Activity Test (PAT). This guarantees that the enclosure will not react chemically with photographs.

Quick Reference: Choosing Enclosures

Choose boxes without gaps or handle holes and with snug lids to help exclude dust and pollutants.
Use acid-free, lignin-free and buffered paper, board and tissue, unless the object is alkaline sensitive.
Use polyester, polyethylene or polypropylene if plastic enclosures are preferred.
Paper and plastic enclosures for photographs should pass the PAT.
The size and shape of envelopes, boxes, and folders should match the objects they hold.
Purchase or make custom-fitted book boxes to ensure proper support and fit.

https://www.nedcc.org/.../caring-for-private-and-family...

And finally:

Another document produced by the Northeast Document Conservation Center that addresses the storage issues related to photographs.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s...

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jbaxter5256
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08 Feb 2019
07:15:25pm
re: Storage and Display

Another useful source for true archival quality storage is a company called Archival Methods at http://www.archivalmethods.com/ as they provide a wide range of useful products including binders, paper, etc. I have been very happy with their service and products.


(Modified by Moderator on 2019-02-09 06:52:14)

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nranderson
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08 Feb 2019
08:35:15pm
re: Storage and Display

Quote:

"I recently did a little research"



Yes keesindy I'll say you did! Thank you so much for all this food for thought.

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51Studebaker
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Dialysis, damned if you do...dead if you don't
08 Feb 2019
08:56:50pm
re: Storage and Display

Enclosing historical documents in ANY kind of page protectors is not done by archival libraries. For example, you will not find sheet protectors of any type being used at the Library of Congress.
Don

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keesindy
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09 Feb 2019
12:37:37am
re: Storage and Display

Quote:

"Enclosing historical documents in ANY kind of page protectors is not done by archival libraries. For example, you will not find sheet protectors of any type being used at the Library of Congress.
Don"



True. They generally have more resources to devote to conservation and collections management. Many local historical societies genealogy enthusiasts survive on limited budgets. They are more likely to resort to convenient methods for displaying and accessing materials. They're often more concerned about paying their bills and mortgates than conserving the collections. In the case that prompted my research, the museum had asked members for donations of 3-ring binder sheet protectors. No specifications whatsoever. I presented my limited research and suggested they consider restricting their request to conservation-quality materials that met a minimum set of criteria. Of course, their dilemma is the higher cost of such products. And, as I discovered, a small number of options to choose from.

Tom
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51Studebaker
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Dialysis, damned if you do...dead if you don't
09 Feb 2019
03:48:09am
re: Storage and Display

Hi Tom,

Quote:

"…They are more likely to resort to convenient methods for displaying and accessing materials. They're often more concerned about paying their bills and mortgates than conserving the collections"


Yikes, that is like a zoo justifying substandard exhibits because they have to pay the rent before taking care of the animals. In my opinion conservation should be a core competency of any historical society. I would question their feasibility if they cannot do their basic responsibilities correctly.

But I think it is great that you are trying to help these folks and I think that your discovery is accurate. In addition to the points your post makes about the terms ‘archival’ and ‘acid free’, I have previously posted that there is no oversight for these manufacturers. Try contacting these manufacturers and ask them for their archival testing methods or results. (They have none.)
What these manufacturers do is simply make a product without PVC plastics and certain plasticizers and then stamp ‘archival’ on the package. Consumers are duped into thinking they are doing the right thing. True archival materials are expensive; it is much more costly to design, test, and monitor the production of archival products.

Lastly, this is what happens when historic document owners restrict air circulation of un-neutralized paper.
https://www.npr.org/2017/02/21/515410087/an-attempt-to-save-south-carolinas-historical-documents-is-destroying-them

Quoting from the archival specialist…
Quote:

"You're effectively forming an envelope where you're keeping the acids in the paper, not allowing them to migrate out," says Molly McGath, a researcher at Johns Hopkins University."



They might want to take a look at this kind of storage
https://www.archives.gov/preservation/holdings-maintenance/procedures.html
Don

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