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Oceania/Australia : eBay and Gumtree and its dangers

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
15 Jun 2018
02:41:55am
Even though there are many stamps sold on eBay, there are some that must be avoided at all cost, such as thin paper, specimens and major varieties.

It’s not to say that every seller must be avoided but it pays off not to approach certain stamps that would normally command a premium.

For instance high value pre-decimal specimen stamps such as the £1 coronation.

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It must be accompanied by an certificate of authority

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The £1 & £2 thin paper Coat-of-Arms with and without roller flaw

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The £1 & £2 Coat-of-Arms specimen with roller flaw

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These stamps should only be bought from a dealer. The £1 coronation specimen is the most forged specimen in the KGVI series, and many people who think they are saving money are actually being scammed.

Overprints are very easily applied dishonestly on a genuine £1 coronation stamp adding hundreds onto their sale, considering the real value range is from $1,200-$1,750 for an authentic specimen.

The £1 and £2 Coat-of-Arms thin paper are about the same value $1,650 compared to a normal thick paper £1 and £2 valued around the $60 - $220 mark, a collector who has never seen one before can be easily duped by a seller adding the word "thin paper" into the description.

As with the thin paper with roller flaw, again, like its cousin above, a normal roller flaw variety, the value would be around the $375 mark, if it were thin paper the value would be $2,950.

The £2 Coat-of-Arms specimen with roller flaw, again the £2 Coat-of-Arms with roller flaw is valued around the $375 mark, with the overprint it is worth $2,250.

Certificates can also be forged, as these items can be downloaded from the internet; the above stamps are authentic and are part of my collection of KGVI stamps.

The £2 Coat-of-Arms specimen with roller flaw does not have a certificate as yet, it has been sent away to have a certificate issued, as this stamp was bought from the same specialists that I have bought all my stamps from, it is just a matter of formality as I know it is genuine.

I have read where many people have been scammed, and there are others who believe they made a buy of the century until they attempt to sell their "rare" stamp/s to a dealer or auction house.

So be careful, only buy overprints, thin papers, either with or without varieties at a physical dealer, and ask if the stamp is an Australian overprint ask if it has a certificate, if not, do not buy it. Thin paper need only be held again the light.

It is wise to always do some research, or speak to someone knowledgeable in the stamp/s you would like to acquire, there are many unscrupulous sellers out there wanting to liberate you from your money.

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"Specialised Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
DaveSheridan
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15 Jun 2018
03:29:39am
re: eBay and Gumtree and its dangers

I admire your bank balance Surprise, and your logic is basically sound.

However, if you want to save thousands, you forgot to mention physical auction houses that allow you to bid and then get a certificate. If the certificate is negative, the sale is void.

I only sell online, and I've sold dozens of items that I've obtained certificates for. Tarring all with one brush is a little harsh.

Paying retail for everything can also lead to disappointment when it comes to sell. The average dealer will give you less than 30-40% of retail to buy back.

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
15 Jun 2018
07:05:51am
re: eBay and Gumtree and its dangers

Hi Dave

I save up a lot, plus my fiancée helps me. With physical auction houses you are correct, but it’s the auction house commission plus credit card fees that tend to make going to an auction house unattractive (to me anyway).

I know it seems tarring the innocent but I’m not, there are many people out there who will take advantage of those who know nothing about what they purchase, and I have seen collections who have “rarities” only to realise that the stamps shown to me were duds.

It's the scammer that gives a bad name to honest people such as you to sell online, but like I mentioned, those wanting to purchase stamps online would need to research, or ask someone knowledgeable about the stamp/s they want to purchase; of course, I will direct those who approach me to those that are a trustworthy vendor, such as yourself.

I know the average dealer will give a collector less than 30% - 40% of retail to buy back, but considering that most of my rarities are very limited in printing, such as the Coat-of-Arms £2 roller flaw on thin paper, there is only 2 in existence. The one I have which is in superb mint unhinged condition and the other which was just auctioned a week ago also in MUH but was centred to the right; I definitely would turn down such an offer.

I believe it depends on what you buy and what you expect to sell the stamp/s for, and whether a collector would accept the 30%-40% depreciation or hold off until a better buying price is found.

I bought a few months ago a MUH block of 20, 1937 150th Anniversary of NSW 2d stamps, normally a block of 20 would cost about $20 or so; I paid $1,750 for mine, it has 4 varieties, the man with tail, Pantaloon, Koala in tree and thick colour lines at the base of a tree; the block of 20 is now worth $2,400.

And yes it is true buying retail can lead to disappointment, but I believe that depends on what you buy and understand what you are buying and whether or not it has potential.

I didn’t know you sold stamps that have certificates of authenticity, that’s quite interesting, as it is certified stamps that I am most interested in.

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"Specialised Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
Horamakhet
07 Aug 2018
09:54:08pm
re: eBay and Gumtree and its dangers

Hi Rob and all others

your comments about Gumtree and Ebay are so correct.
There are so many scammers out there.

I have a collection of early Greek stamps, (including the 1896 Olympics).
Now Greece is not my field, but, they are part of the family accumulation.
I put them on Gumtree, and lets just say that I had a persistent person wanting to aquire the items.

They person wanted to meet me in all sorts of strange places, so I got very wary.

They were so persistent, I did some research, and sure enough some of the stamps were worth a lot of money.

Needless to say, I will keep the stamps and pass them on to my children.

Finding good stamps is getting harder and harder, but some times I get lucky, and find stamps in places that you would not think to look.
Sometimes friends offer me there childhood collections, and I always ask what they think is a fair price. They are happy, and I am happy, but all the really good stuff is disappearing fast. But you never know what is just waiting for you to find.
Regards

Horamakhet



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kgvistamps
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Collecting King George VI from all countries, and King Edward VII and King George V from the West Indies.
08 Aug 2018
10:06:02am
re: eBay and Gumtree and its dangers

I sell British Colony stamps thru my own website and use ebay as my primary buying source.
There are a number of knowledgeable dealers, a lot of uninformed sellers, and some crooks. Currently I have over 36,0000 lots for sale all at various prices based on the condition of the item.

The on-line buying rule I have is to ignore any claims of rarity and focus on the identification of the stamp. I try to buy stamps from sellers who show both sides so I can determine the quality of the perfs, the condition and in many cases the watermark. I figure out what I would sell that item for and bid a percentage of that sales price - depending on my stock status and how valuable I think it might be.

I totally avoid any rare or valuable items - regardless of the certificate because certificates can be forged, and some certificates are just plain wrong. I think ebay and the other on-line auction houses can be a safe place to shop if you use some common sense, do your own expertizing, and don't believe the hype (when it appears).

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Snick1946
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APS Life Member
08 Aug 2018
10:50:50am
re: eBay and Gumtree and its dangers

OK, I'll ask: What is 'Gumtree'?

It' part of the thread title but not mentioned elsewhere that I see. Is it a selling venue based in Australia?

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Horamakhet
08 Aug 2018
10:48:03pm
re: eBay and Gumtree and its dangers


Hi Snick1946

Gumtree is like an auction site,it is an Australian site, does a lot of buy swap and sell type activity,
but it is also owned and run by Ebay, a fact that not a lot of persons know.

There have been many times it has been in the news with persons advertising phones, cars and bikes, and arranging to meet persons for test drives, only to have their items stolen from them.

It has it merits too, but, just be careful.

Regards

Horamakhet

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