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United States/Covers & Postmarks : 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

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tooler
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20 Feb 2018
04:03:48pm
While looking at some Air Mail covers I've had for years I came across this one, I guess I missed it because there are no Air Mail stamps on it and just never looked close. The 5¢ rate was made using two 1¢ Franklin's and a 3¢ Lincoln.
As you can see the cover is postmarked Aug 3 1929 and the stamps are Kansas Overprint.
My Question is, are they real or counterfeit? Is this common to find these on cover?
Any other information, if you like, would be appreciated.Image Not FoundImage Not Found


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dani20
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20 Feb 2018
04:29:14pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

A nice cover-not particularly noted in my 1999 Specialized cat., but nice to have.
Dan C.

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51Studebaker
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20 Feb 2018
04:50:35pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

It is real, value around $5.00 (US). It is the correct rate for 1929 airmail (5 cents).

The Greater Burlington Association was a community service club and worked with other clubs that served the rural community in Kansas Iowa.

Here are a few mentions of them...

Local groups “…who helped materially in furthering 4-H club work were the newspapers of the county (Burlington Gazette and the Burlington Hawkeye), the Greater Burlington Association, the Burlington banks and business men.”

The 1926 Extension Report included: “The clothing clubs…reach and influence more homes than does any other of the clubs. The work…has been influential causing the girls to wear approved shoes, to use better judgment in the planning of their entire wardrobe…” Indeed, included in a 4-H program flyer that year were the Ten Commandments for an Iowa Club Girl. Along with such items as “Thou shalt appreciate good music” and “Thou shalt learn to ply the needle” was “Thou shalt not have ten sardines, but ten toes”. The cooperation of the Greater Burlington Association, The Burlington Gazette and of Glick’s Wearing Apparel for Women was reported to be very instrumental in making the clothing clubs a success.

One year the Greater Burlington Association hosted the annual club banquet at Hotel Burlington with the Honorable John Hammill, Governor of Iowa, and R.K. Bliss, Iowa Extension Director as speakers. As usual, group singing was part of the program – songs such as Till We Meet Again, the Iowa Corn Song and Jingle Bells.
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Don

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Anglophile
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RPSL, APS, EPA; US, GB, Ireland, British Europe, Italy, Mauritius Classics
20 Feb 2018
06:01:49pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

Don, do you have the right Burlington? The cover is canceled in Burlington Iowa. There is also a Burlington Kansas.

In fact, the Iowa postmark makes me wonder if the cover is philatelic. Burlington Iowa is separated from Kansas (where these overprints were sold) by the entire state of Missouri.

One interesting note on cancel technique is that the postal clerk, holding a duplex hammer device, used the right edge at an angle to cancel the Franklin stamps, resulting in partial strikes that look like a headdress on Ben, and a flat full strike on the Lincoln stamp. This produced obliteration on all 3 while still having a single legible date mark.

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51Studebaker
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20 Feb 2018
07:36:57pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

Hi Chris,
Yes, what I posted above is from the Iowa 4-H History page, I mistaken typed Kansas, sorry. I assumed that someone simply had the Kansas stamps on hand or perhaps, being a club, someone had donated them. (You know how clubs sometimes have to scramble to make ends meet.)

https://www.iowa4hfoundation.org/index.cfm/36964/18392/des_moines_county_iowa_4h_history

I'm am not sure the cover is philatelic. It does not appear to be commemorating anything special, the stamp combination is not special, the date does not seem to be special. I am thinking it was club mail.
Don

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ikeyPikey
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21 Feb 2018
10:20:32am
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

What means “Thou shalt not have ten sardines, but ten toes”?

Are we encouraging the young ladies to rinse their feet on rising?

And how did sardines get such a bad rap in the Midwest?

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey (whose go-to breakfast is a can of sardines on a large slice of Costco banana nut bread)

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tooler
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21 Feb 2018
12:20:11pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

Some good information Don, Thanks.

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51Studebaker
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21 Feb 2018
03:03:58pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

Quote:

"What means “Thou shalt not have ten sardines, but ten toes”?
Are we encouraging the young ladies to rinse their feet on rising?
And how did sardines get such a bad rap in the Midwest?"



Hi ikey,
The mid-1920s were celebrating 'coming out' of the dark depression years. Fashions became more daring, women got the right to vote and began to leave the house and enter the work force. Skirts moved upward and it was now acceptable for women to dress more like men thanks to Chanel. I assumed that it meant that the open-toed shoes and flats were now also acceptable and women no longer had to crush their feet and toes into tightly enclosed shoes.
Don
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GeoStamper
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Steve
21 Feb 2018
03:52:13pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

I learn something new every time I visit SOR! Found this site valuable as well:

http://values.hobbizine.com/stamps/us-1929-kansas-nebraska.html

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Makes me want to take a break from WW for a while and return to my US collection...Day Dreaming

-Steve




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pigdoc
21 Feb 2018
04:45:53pm
re: 1929 Kansas Overprint on cover

This issue has an interesting history, not least of which is this:

In 1973, Schoen estimated that "no issue of United States stamps is so extensively imitated and over 60 per cent of the used copies are not genuine."

Schoen, Robert H., and DeVoss, James T. Counterfeit Kansas-Nebraska Overprints on the 1922-34 Issue. 1973. (Printed by the American Philatelic Society in their APS Handbook Series.)

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