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Oceania/Australia : Shade Progression of the 8½d & 2'6d Aborigine

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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
17 Feb 2018
05:25:32pm
Gwoya Tjungurrayi also spelt Gwoya Jungarai or Gwoya Djungarai. (c. 1895 – 28 March 1965) was a Walpiri-Anmatyerre man of the Northern Territory of Australia. Also known by his nickname One Pound Jimmy, he became the first Aboriginal person to be featured on an Australian postage stamp.

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1950. A seldom seen progression of shades from pale brown to chestnut-brown.

The 2'6d featured an enlarged version of the 8½d design depicting a portrait of Djungarai
("One Pound Jimmy")
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1. 1952 - Sepia: 2. 1952 - Blackish-Brown: 3. 1957 - Sepia: 4. 1957 - Blackish-Brown:
5. 1965 - Sepia (emergency printing): 6. 1965 - Blackish-Brown (emergency printing)

Tjungurrayi was born in the Tanami Desert of the Northern Territory, 200 kilometres north-west of Alice Springs, in the region surrounding Coniston Station around 1895. His first name Gwoja means water. His last name reflects his skin name was Tjungurrayi. As pastoralism expanded in the region during the early 1900s, encroaching further into Tjungurrayi’s ancestral country, tensions intensified during the drought of the 1920s, with increasing competition over water and food. He survived the Coniston Massacre in the Northern Territory in 1928, although accounts of his survival differ:

"One claimed his father was taken prisoner by Constable Murray, escaped and fled with his family to the Arltunga region east of Alice Springs. Another described Tjungurrayi ‘worming his way out from among the dead and dying’ at Yurrkuru to ‘narrowly escape death from a hail of rifle fire poured at him by whites’."

Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri’s oral account of his stepfather’s capture and evasion records that a mounted policeman arrested and chained him up before ‘carry him ‘round to show’m every soakage. They leave him... tied up on a tree, big chain... they put leg chain too... Then everybody go out and shoot all the people... They come back and see him — nothing! This chain he broke’m with a big rock and he take off... to mine

After the massacre, Tjungurrayi spent time in Alyawarre country near Arltunga before settling at Napperby.

Tjungurrayi made and sold boomerangs, that he sold for one pound each. Some sources claim this is where the nickname 'One Pound Jimmy' comes from. Whenever asked how much one of his pieces were, he would answer "One pound, boss.

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Gwoya Djungarai "One Pound Jimmy"

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"Specialised Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
Horamakhet
17 Feb 2018
11:15:58pm
re: Shade Progression of the 8½d & 2'6d Aborigine

Hi to all


It is interesting to not that the 2/6d Aborigine with the crown to the left of the COA watermark is still listed in SG as 253aa but with a price of five thousand pounds for a used copy.

It is not as rare as first thought, and you can pick up copies for a s low as $750.00 Australian dollars. in used condition.

There are quite a few Unused copies as well, but Gibbons has still not updated its catalogue.

Horamaket

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Horamakhet
17 Feb 2018
11:36:14pm
re: Shade Progression of the 8½d & 2'6d Aborigine

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Hi to all

I don't actively collect 1st day covers, but in my family collection are hundreds of them.
This one is interesting because it has a nice gutter pair of 81/2d Aborigine.

For some reason the First Day Cover caption has been blacked out, but I can not read the date as it is too light, other than Brisbane Qld, Australia and the number 3

It was Posted from the Post Master General's Department in Brisbane.




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Rob1956
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Member ACCC (Australian Commonwealth Collectors Club of NSW)
18 Feb 2018
12:28:08am
re: Shade Progression of the 8½d & 2'6d Aborigine

The FDC would have been issued on August 14, 1950, so the cancellation would be of the same date. But then it could have been used as a normal express post at a later date and the words "First Day Cover" obliterated, pity the faintness of the cancellation date.

There is a lot of nostalgia on that envelope, I remember as a kid the type of GPO bike the courier is riding.

The watermark sideways inverted, in recent years a few have been found unused and used. In the ACSC it is catalogued as 265a and in MUH it is valued at $5750, MLH $4500 and Used $1500.

But the inverted watermark isn't the most expensive, the stamps with the imperforate top is valued at $7500, and so far what has been found is in MLH.

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"Specialised Collector of Australian Pre-Decimal & Decimal Stamps"
        
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