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General Philatelic/Gen. Discussion : Mixed frankings

 

Author
Postings
pigdoc

15 Jan 2018
03:47:16pm
Hi Folks,
I present, for your interest, an example of mixed franking. This is an area that I have not really pursued as a collecting interest, but it is tempting!

I have a comprehensive collection of Danish West Indies. In 1917, On January 17, 1917, Denmark sold the West Indies to the United States for $25 million. Danish administration ended on 31 March 1917, when the United States took formal possession of the territory and renamed it the United States Virgin Islands. This was not a universally popular event among citizens, prompting the production of labels protesting the sale. Here are the two versions of that label that I have seen (from my collection):
Image Not Found

"MOD SALGET" translates from Danish to "against the sale"

Image Not Found
From the period April 1, 1917 through September 30, 1917, mixed frankings were allowed. Here is a cover from the last day of Danish sovereignity:
Image Not Found
And, finally, here is an early mixed franking cover:
Image Not Found
These are both (somewhat obviously) philatelic covers. I don't think I've ever seen a mixed franking DWI cover that wasn't. They come up fairly regularly on eBay, and many of them are to the same addressee, who I presume created them. Some do not have "American Virgin Islands" on them.

I'm interested in seeing more mixed franking covers!
Show 'em if you got 'em!
Thanks!

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vjones48
Members Picture


There is brilliance in simplicity

15 Jan 2018
05:47:17pm
re: Mixed frankings

The only mixed franking I have.

Image Not Found

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" The Devil is in the details"
pigdoc

29 Nov 2018
12:14:36pm
re: Mixed frankings

While we're 'talking Ecuador' I thought I'd toss up this recent acquisition:

Image Not Found

It's a souvenir cover for the first flight of FAM 9, but for only part of the way between Cristobal and Mollendo. According to AAMS, it's not one of the more valuable covers for this route, but it's not the cheapest, either. All the mail from the US that was carried on this flight was flown from Miami, arriving in Cristobal on May 14, 1929.

I am attracted to mixed frankings. The Ecuadorian stamp was applied after the cover was addressed. The cover is signed by the pilot, Frank Ormsbee, and self-addressed by B. L. Rowe, a co-owner and another pilot-of-note for PANAGRA (that's his handwriting). Interesting that Ormsbee noted the registration number of the airplane, NC 9775, which is the second Sikorsky S38-B flying boat that was built, of 80 total. The Sikorsky S-38 first flew in May, 1928. There is a backstamp, matching the Esmeraldas cancellation on the front. Of particular note also is that the Canal Zone Air Mail overprint is Scott C2, Type II, which is worth more than 10X the Type I variety. The distinguishing feature is the shape of the horizontal stroke on the "5" of the overprint.

Not quite sure why the Ecuadorian stamp was applied, or even if it is a truly "legitimate" usage.

I've kind of gotten away from collecting souvenir covers. Don't have a lot of them, thank goodness. Have re-directed towards covers that are non-philatelic, GPU, that traveled in pioneering air mails. But, I couldn't resist this one, especially at about one-quarter of AAMS's stated value. I didn't know it had the rarer C2 until after I received it and examined it closely.

-Paul

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Holstein2007

13 Jan 2019
03:14:28am
re: Mixed frankings

Image Not Found

Transfer period 1.4.- 30.9 1917

Foreign letter sent from Christiansted to Copenhagen 21. April 1917, bearing a 1 cent and two 10 Bit - total for foreign letter rate 5 cents (25 Bit) (1 cents = 5 bit) cancelled with the danish Christiansted and sealed with censorship british labels . It is backstopped Kjøbenhavn 7 Jun - meaning 46 days transit.

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pigdoc

13 Jan 2019
11:39:02am
re: Mixed frankings

VERY cool, Holstein!

This is the first time I've seen one of these that was not (obviously) a philatelic cover. And, that it's censored makes it all the more intriguing. (Censoring no doubt, added to transit time, and I find it interesting to document those lags. I am much more attracted to censored covers with receiver cancellations than those without.)

For the collectors who are not Denmark specialists, the Danish West Indies were purchased by the US to bolster national security during WWI. DWI officially became a US possession on March 31, 1917. For the 6 months following, it was legal to use DWI postage, including mixed frankings of DWI and US issues together.

There are not a lot of these covers in the marketplace, and I have seen them for sale with asking prices in excess of $800. This one is special, because it seems to be a non-philatelic usage.

Thanks for posting!
-Paul


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Holstein2007

19 Jan 2019
07:15:26am
re: Mixed frankings

Image Not Found


Not a mix franking - but a letter sent in the transfer period with British consorship in second weight class - note the rare US Postmark Rec.d Charlotte Amalie St.Thomas

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Author/Postings
pigdoc

15 Jan 2018
03:47:16pm

Hi Folks,
I present, for your interest, an example of mixed franking. This is an area that I have not really pursued as a collecting interest, but it is tempting!

I have a comprehensive collection of Danish West Indies. In 1917, On January 17, 1917, Denmark sold the West Indies to the United States for $25 million. Danish administration ended on 31 March 1917, when the United States took formal possession of the territory and renamed it the United States Virgin Islands. This was not a universally popular event among citizens, prompting the production of labels protesting the sale. Here are the two versions of that label that I have seen (from my collection):
Image Not Found

"MOD SALGET" translates from Danish to "against the sale"

Image Not Found
From the period April 1, 1917 through September 30, 1917, mixed frankings were allowed. Here is a cover from the last day of Danish sovereignity:
Image Not Found
And, finally, here is an early mixed franking cover:
Image Not Found
These are both (somewhat obviously) philatelic covers. I don't think I've ever seen a mixed franking DWI cover that wasn't. They come up fairly regularly on eBay, and many of them are to the same addressee, who I presume created them. Some do not have "American Virgin Islands" on them.

I'm interested in seeing more mixed franking covers!
Show 'em if you got 'em!
Thanks!

Like 
4 Members
like this post.
Login to Like.
Members Picture
vjones48

There is brilliance in simplicity
15 Jan 2018
05:47:17pm

re: Mixed frankings

The only mixed franking I have.

Image Not Found

Like 
3 Members
like this post.
Login to Like.

" The Devil is in the details"
pigdoc

29 Nov 2018
12:14:36pm

re: Mixed frankings

While we're 'talking Ecuador' I thought I'd toss up this recent acquisition:

Image Not Found

It's a souvenir cover for the first flight of FAM 9, but for only part of the way between Cristobal and Mollendo. According to AAMS, it's not one of the more valuable covers for this route, but it's not the cheapest, either. All the mail from the US that was carried on this flight was flown from Miami, arriving in Cristobal on May 14, 1929.

I am attracted to mixed frankings. The Ecuadorian stamp was applied after the cover was addressed. The cover is signed by the pilot, Frank Ormsbee, and self-addressed by B. L. Rowe, a co-owner and another pilot-of-note for PANAGRA (that's his handwriting). Interesting that Ormsbee noted the registration number of the airplane, NC 9775, which is the second Sikorsky S38-B flying boat that was built, of 80 total. The Sikorsky S-38 first flew in May, 1928. There is a backstamp, matching the Esmeraldas cancellation on the front. Of particular note also is that the Canal Zone Air Mail overprint is Scott C2, Type II, which is worth more than 10X the Type I variety. The distinguishing feature is the shape of the horizontal stroke on the "5" of the overprint.

Not quite sure why the Ecuadorian stamp was applied, or even if it is a truly "legitimate" usage.

I've kind of gotten away from collecting souvenir covers. Don't have a lot of them, thank goodness. Have re-directed towards covers that are non-philatelic, GPU, that traveled in pioneering air mails. But, I couldn't resist this one, especially at about one-quarter of AAMS's stated value. I didn't know it had the rarer C2 until after I received it and examined it closely.

-Paul

Like
Login to Like
this post
Holstein2007

13 Jan 2019
03:14:28am

re: Mixed frankings

Image Not Found

Transfer period 1.4.- 30.9 1917

Foreign letter sent from Christiansted to Copenhagen 21. April 1917, bearing a 1 cent and two 10 Bit - total for foreign letter rate 5 cents (25 Bit) (1 cents = 5 bit) cancelled with the danish Christiansted and sealed with censorship british labels . It is backstopped Kjøbenhavn 7 Jun - meaning 46 days transit.

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
pigdoc

13 Jan 2019
11:39:02am

re: Mixed frankings

VERY cool, Holstein!

This is the first time I've seen one of these that was not (obviously) a philatelic cover. And, that it's censored makes it all the more intriguing. (Censoring no doubt, added to transit time, and I find it interesting to document those lags. I am much more attracted to censored covers with receiver cancellations than those without.)

For the collectors who are not Denmark specialists, the Danish West Indies were purchased by the US to bolster national security during WWI. DWI officially became a US possession on March 31, 1917. For the 6 months following, it was legal to use DWI postage, including mixed frankings of DWI and US issues together.

There are not a lot of these covers in the marketplace, and I have seen them for sale with asking prices in excess of $800. This one is special, because it seems to be a non-philatelic usage.

Thanks for posting!
-Paul


Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
Holstein2007

19 Jan 2019
07:15:26am

re: Mixed frankings

Image Not Found


Not a mix franking - but a letter sent in the transfer period with British consorship in second weight class - note the rare US Postmark Rec.d Charlotte Amalie St.Thomas

Like
Login to Like
this post
        

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