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Middle East/All : Another PalestinB Variety Need info urgently as I purchased this item and need to know?

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canadapatry
28 Sep 2017
09:21:00am
Could someone let me know whether this is real I purchased it and need to know? The variety is on the upper left stamp.

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rrraphy
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Retired Ap. Book Mod, Pres Golden Gate Stamp Club, Hi Tech Consultant
30 Sep 2017
01:47:25pm

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re: Another PalestinB Variety Need info urgently as I purchased this item and need to know?

Stanley...I don't know
There are so many varieties of the overprint. Nothing in yours shouts out "FAKE", but I don't know.
The one thing that bothers me a lot is that the size of the latin and hebrew lines, which are virtually identical in most varieties of the o/p, in your case they are not.
The only way to go any further is to put a 1mm plastic grid on top, photograph it and compare it one by one to the known 24 (Type i) or 12 (type 2) settings..just in case.
Then you can decide whether is is a B or an E for the error, although I would not call it a well shaped error.
Since yours is a 2p you don't have to worry about the 6 mm spacing variety of type 1. (I would still compare the o/p in case the forger..if any...made a mistake.)
The other problem I face is that the -"- hebrew letter on the LHS that is used to identify type I and II, is level in some (the two LHS) and above on others (the two RHS). so I am confused. I would guess it is more akin to " raised above adjacent letters (?)

So not much help!
I will post this answer on the discussion board for others to look at it.
rrr...

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"E. Rutherford: All science is either physics or stamp collecting."
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01 Oct 2017
07:42:13am
re: Another PalestinB Variety Need info urgently as I purchased this item and need to know?

I share the concerns on this and other similar discussions on overprints. I have stopped collecting certain areas because it very difficult to be sure if the overprints are genuine.The genuine original overprints in Palestine were mainly done by hand which has lead to the high possibility of many varieties. It can be quite hard to sort out the different genuine types, before even considering deliberate adulteration of overprints.
I have several B varieties in my collection, and seeing these posts makes me think again.
I have spent considerable time attempting to sort out overprints of Palestine, but still cannot be sue that I have got it correct!
There are only a very small number of experts in this area, and one I know is a well respected man of over 90 who I followed round the room at a stamp fair in London about 18 months ago!We both were looking at Palestine overprints!

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musicman
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APS #213005
01 Oct 2017
09:13:26am
re: Another PalestinB Variety Need info urgently as I purchased this item and need to know?

First, let me say that I am not a WW collector.

That being said, my question is this;



Are these stamps worth such a value that one must go to these great lengths to identify/verify/authenticate them?


Or is it just because they are difficult to I.D., and not related to value?



Curiosity here....Happy

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01 Nov 2017
02:18:50pm
re: Another PalestinB Variety Need info urgently as I purchased this item and need to know?

Value varies! Some are very common and cheap,others less so.

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papakuma
28 Dec 2018
08:06:54pm
re: Another PalestinB Variety Need info urgently as I purchased this item and need to know?

The EEF British Mandate stamps are fascinating and much has been written to assist the collector. The most useful resource I have found are the Bale catalogs.

This block of stamps is from the Jerusalem I release. When the British assumed control of much of Ottoman Middle East at the close of WWI, a stamp was issued first for military use ("the Blues") and later altered when reissued for civilian use. The stamp was first introduced in the 1 piaster value and featured an indigo background with a design by Lt. Rowntree, featuring a central Arabic calligraphy (Khalas el Urjah or Postage Paid in English) with denomination in English on the left side and in Arabic on the right. The E.E.F. on top and bottom stands for Egyptian Expeditionary Force (then the British Military in the Middle East). In 1920, the stamp was "re-issued" for civilian use in different values and colors. Beginning with the Jerusalem I series in September 1920, these aforementioned stamps were then re-issued with an overprint naming the Mandate in each of the 3 languages in use. The Arabic lies at the top and in this case measures 8 rather than 10 mm (you can also tell this by the distance comparison of the EEF being slightly larger then the Arabic line. PALESTINE lies in the middle and because the typeface has serifs (think Times New Roman rather than Helvetica font) it is one of the Jerusalem series. Finally at the bottom, is the Hebrew version read from right to left with one notable addition, the Aleph Yud abbreviation. In a bow to the Jewish Agency and the promise made by His Majesty's Government in the Balfour Decleration, this abbreviated form of Eretz Yisrael was added. This is the proper name for the area to all Jews during the 2000 years of the Diaspora. You should know that the name Palestine was invented by the Romans after subduing the rebellious province of Judea and was specifically chosen as a "poke in the eye" to the Jewish people as it was meant to closely resemble Philistina, or the historic arch enemy of Israel, the Philistines (as mentioned in Judges in the Bible).

Getting back to the stamp. The Jerusalem series is so termed because the overprinting was performed in the Greek Orthodox Convent of Jerusalem. The lithography plate used for the first series was composed of 2 horizontal dyes of 12 stamps each and because the dyes were fragile (made of lead) and the prinface was exceptionally small, there are a variety of constant flaws that recur throughout a printers sheet in the same locations. As such they cannot be considered errors. The 2 most famous and rare are the "Arabic Z' and the Hebrew Transposition. These flaws found in the first column and eleventh column of stamps in every sheet were discovered early before being delivered for retail sales and as such the first, eleventh and twelfth column of stamps of these printer sheets were removed and disposed of. Fortunately the collector will occasionally stumble on one but usually at a fairly high price.

The flaw in this case of PALESTINB is constant and found in positions 23 and 24. Other similar flaws include PALESTIN13 and the substitution of a square box for the final letter E. Other less common flaws include PALESTINF, PALKSTINE, PALESPINE and PALESTINR. Again the collector should be aware that these are not errors but constant flaws as errors typical come with a demand for a higher price than expected for a constant flaw.


As always, feel free to correct, amend or comment.
Joel in Minnesota

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