What we collect!

 

Stamporama Discussion Board Logo
For People Who Love To Talk About Stamps
Stamporama Discussion Board Logo
For People Who Love To Talk About Stamps
Stamporama Discussion Board Logo
For People Who Love To Talk About Stamps



What we collect!
20 visitors online
What we collect!
20 visitors online


Europe/Other : Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

 

Author
Postings
Linus
Members Picture


03 Feb 2017
02:37:20pm
I recently acquired the postcard shown below:

Image Not Found

Image Not Found

I was wondering if this card was "postage due" because of the upside down 3 in a box just left of the postage stamp. Also, what is up with all the numbers stamped side-by-side along the bottom edge? Anybody seen these before or know what these are?

Linus
Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
philb
Members Picture


03 Feb 2017
04:05:54pm

Auctions
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

Linus what a great card !!!! i was recently wondering about the A 799 on my card. Our friends in The Netherlands can probably tell us the answer.Image Not Found

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.

"And every hair is measured like every grain of sand"
Linus
Members Picture


14 Mar 2017
04:55:54pm
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

Phil,

The Dutch seemed to like numbers back then. Must of been some sort of routing system.

Linus

Like
Login to Like
this post
Jansimon
Members Picture


collector, seller, MT member

14 Mar 2017
05:48:45pm

Approvals
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

The cancel A799 is a postman identification cancel. It shows that the letter was delivered in Amsterdam at the first delivery round (at that time the mail was delivered seven (!) times per day, the deliveries were marked A through G) by a postman who used cancel 799. I cannot find who this was, but the cancel was handed out in January 1916, so he was working as a postman for at least 8 years when this card was mailed.

The card to Chicago was rejected. I cannot read the blue and red texts precisely, but the first blue words are "niet toegelaten" = not allowed.
The other words are unclear, but look like they are "return sender" and "address unknown" (almost sounds like an Elvis song now!)
The cancels at the bottom show that a large number of postal employees have been busy with this card. No letters, which indicates that the card did not leave the post office. The 3 in octagon is from the office manager who also had to look at this card.

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.

www.etsy.com/nl/shop/itsallmadeofpaper/
philb
Members Picture


14 Mar 2017
05:56:29pm

Auctions
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

The postal service has certainly changed...they do not have to deliver twice a day like when i was a kid...but when they had people that knew the route you received your own mail and not your neighbors....now they use part timers to deliver the mail..crazy !

Like
Login to Like
this post

"And every hair is measured like every grain of sand"
simothecat

14 Mar 2017
07:01:54pm
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

As I read the first postcard:

Top and bottom horizontal lines in blue: Niet toegelaten / Terug afzender (Not allowed, return to sender)

Red in between: Afzender onbekend, doorzenden (sender unknown, send on (to Chicago))

Blue at angle at top: doorzenden (send on)

Blue at right: afzender onbekend

Blue at bottom T (horizontal) Haag(?) (T means postaqe due)

As Jan Simon says, the 3 in octagon is the office manager. The numbers across the bottom are the delivery men confirming that they do not know who the sender was. (This was in the days when the deliverymen know everybody on their route.)

So: The postcard was written 26 November, stamp was canceled 27 November, for some reason the postcard was not allowed and had to be returned to sender. Nobody knew the sender, so it could not be returned. It was sent on (cancel 28 November), arrived in New York 11 December, and Chicago 15(?) December.

Why the postcard was not allowed, I don't know. The 5 cent postage is correct. Perhaps it was mailed without a stamp, and the stamp was added by the postoffice, but this is just guesswork.

Jan

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
Linus
Members Picture


14 Mar 2017
10:34:45pm
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

Thank you, Jan and Jan Simon, very much for the detailed explanation of my postcard! I have learned a great deal, and I will keep your explanation/translation narrative along with this postcard in my postal history collection. I just happened to find this card at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Des Moines, Iowa, USA, and I knew it had a story to tell.

I appreciate your help,

Linus

Like
Login to Like
this post
Jansimon
Members Picture


collector, seller, MT member

15 Mar 2017
04:11:03am

Approvals
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

I think the card may have been rejected because it was not in accordance with UPU regulations for postal cards. It could be the size, the lack of the required inscriptions or the amount of writing on the picture side. It could even be that this card was rejected by mistake, because at the UPU congress of 1897 the regulations for postal cards had been relaxed and perhaps the postal workers in The Hague were not aware of this when they rejected the card in 1898...

Like
Login to Like
this post

www.etsy.com/nl/shop/itsallmadeofpaper/
Zhai

02 Jun 2019
06:37:56am
re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

nice postcard! thanks!

Like
Login to Like
this post
        

 

Author/Postings
Members Picture
Linus

03 Feb 2017
02:37:20pm

I recently acquired the postcard shown below:

Image Not Found

Image Not Found

I was wondering if this card was "postage due" because of the upside down 3 in a box just left of the postage stamp. Also, what is up with all the numbers stamped side-by-side along the bottom edge? Anybody seen these before or know what these are?

Linus

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
Members Picture
philb

03 Feb 2017
04:05:54pm

Auctions

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

Linus what a great card !!!! i was recently wondering about the A 799 on my card. Our friends in The Netherlands can probably tell us the answer.Image Not Found

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.

"And every hair is measured like every grain of sand"
Members Picture
Linus

14 Mar 2017
04:55:54pm

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

Phil,

The Dutch seemed to like numbers back then. Must of been some sort of routing system.

Linus

Like
Login to Like
this post
Members Picture
Jansimon

collector, seller, MT member
14 Mar 2017
05:48:45pm

Approvals

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

The cancel A799 is a postman identification cancel. It shows that the letter was delivered in Amsterdam at the first delivery round (at that time the mail was delivered seven (!) times per day, the deliveries were marked A through G) by a postman who used cancel 799. I cannot find who this was, but the cancel was handed out in January 1916, so he was working as a postman for at least 8 years when this card was mailed.

The card to Chicago was rejected. I cannot read the blue and red texts precisely, but the first blue words are "niet toegelaten" = not allowed.
The other words are unclear, but look like they are "return sender" and "address unknown" (almost sounds like an Elvis song now!)
The cancels at the bottom show that a large number of postal employees have been busy with this card. No letters, which indicates that the card did not leave the post office. The 3 in octagon is from the office manager who also had to look at this card.

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.

www.etsy.com/nl/shop ...
Members Picture
philb

14 Mar 2017
05:56:29pm

Auctions

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

The postal service has certainly changed...they do not have to deliver twice a day like when i was a kid...but when they had people that knew the route you received your own mail and not your neighbors....now they use part timers to deliver the mail..crazy !

Like
Login to Like
this post

"And every hair is measured like every grain of sand"
simothecat

14 Mar 2017
07:01:54pm

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

As I read the first postcard:

Top and bottom horizontal lines in blue: Niet toegelaten / Terug afzender (Not allowed, return to sender)

Red in between: Afzender onbekend, doorzenden (sender unknown, send on (to Chicago))

Blue at angle at top: doorzenden (send on)

Blue at right: afzender onbekend

Blue at bottom T (horizontal) Haag(?) (T means postaqe due)

As Jan Simon says, the 3 in octagon is the office manager. The numbers across the bottom are the delivery men confirming that they do not know who the sender was. (This was in the days when the deliverymen know everybody on their route.)

So: The postcard was written 26 November, stamp was canceled 27 November, for some reason the postcard was not allowed and had to be returned to sender. Nobody knew the sender, so it could not be returned. It was sent on (cancel 28 November), arrived in New York 11 December, and Chicago 15(?) December.

Why the postcard was not allowed, I don't know. The 5 cent postage is correct. Perhaps it was mailed without a stamp, and the stamp was added by the postoffice, but this is just guesswork.

Jan

Like 
1 Member
likes this post.
Login to Like.
Members Picture
Linus

14 Mar 2017
10:34:45pm

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

Thank you, Jan and Jan Simon, very much for the detailed explanation of my postcard! I have learned a great deal, and I will keep your explanation/translation narrative along with this postcard in my postal history collection. I just happened to find this card at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Des Moines, Iowa, USA, and I knew it had a story to tell.

I appreciate your help,

Linus

Like
Login to Like
this post
Members Picture
Jansimon

collector, seller, MT member
15 Mar 2017
04:11:03am

Approvals

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

I think the card may have been rejected because it was not in accordance with UPU regulations for postal cards. It could be the size, the lack of the required inscriptions or the amount of writing on the picture side. It could even be that this card was rejected by mistake, because at the UPU congress of 1897 the regulations for postal cards had been relaxed and perhaps the postal workers in The Hague were not aware of this when they rejected the card in 1898...

Like
Login to Like
this post

www.etsy.com/nl/shop ...
Zhai

02 Jun 2019
06:37:56am

re: Number Cancellations From The Netherlands

nice postcard! thanks!

Like
Login to Like
this post
        

Contact Webmaster | Visitors Online | Unsubscribe Emails


User Agreement

Copyright © 2022 Stamporama.com