What we collect!
Stamporama Discussion Board Logo
For People Who Love To Talk About Stamps


64 visitors online

Canada/Stamps : When were Canadian stamps first sold outside the post office?

AuthorPostings
Bobstamp
Members Picture

10 Jan 2017
11:27:15pm
Not many people in Vancouver these days go to a post office to buy stamps, for two reasons:

• There are very few true post offices left, and the ones that are left are open only 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on weekdays.

• It's usually more convenient to go to a Canada Post sub-station operated by a private contractor. The Canada Post web site calls them post offices, but they're not. They are generally operated by the owners of other businesses, such as London Drugs, luggage stores, etc. They are normally open 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. five days a week, and until 5:00 or 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Does anyone know when did Canada Post began outsourcing its products and services to commercial retailers? As late as 1985, the Lord's Day Act prohibited commercial transactions on Sundays. I'm guessing that, before that time, if someone needed to buy a stamp on a Saturday or a Sunday, they were out of luck.

Bob


Like
Login to Like
this post

www.ephemeraltreasures.net
bobgggg
President Cortlandt Stamp Club
11 Jan 2017
12:03:08pm
re: When were Canadian stamps first sold outside the post office?

This may be of help...

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/canada-post-corporation/


(Modified by Moderator on 2017-01-11 16:27:39)

Like
Login to Like
this post
Bobstamp
Members Picture

12 Jan 2017
04:19:00pm
re: When were Canadian stamps first sold outside the post office?

Thanks, Bobgggg. However, I wasn't able to find any information about the Canadian postal substations. Not a big deal. I was mostly just curious.

Bob

Like
Login to Like
this post

www.ephemeraltreasures.net
Shibumi
Members Picture

21 Oct 2017
03:11:54pm
re: When were Canadian stamps first sold outside the post office?

bobstamp - I don't know where you got that legislation reference but it has not applied in Canada in many many years - and thank Minerva for that.

Like
Login to Like
this post

davidgjones.authorsxpress.com/2012/05/14/david-g-jones-author-of-the-school-of-sun-tzu/
nlroberts1961
12,8 cm Kanone 43 L/55 in blueprints only
21 Oct 2017
10:46:39pm
re: When were Canadian stamps first sold outside the post office?

I think 1986 or 87 was when the major shift to Shoppers Drug Mart type outlets began. It was part of the Mulroney govts plan to rationalize CPC. The plan began part of canada posts operations in 1986 but i think it was 87 before the implementation was fully underway.

The office types are listed on

http://www.postalhistorycanada.net/php/PostOffices/intro.php

They have a lot more info but the ones you are referring to i think are :

Type 12 / Sub-office (RPO) - found mainly in stores, this type of operation has been around for over 100 years until the replacement by the current system of franchises. After the late 1980s sub-offices (type 12) were classified as RPOs (retail postal outlets). Since Railway Post Offices (R.P.O.s) were eliminated with the final R.P.O. run on April 24, 1971, it should not be a problem differentiating the two types of postal services.

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Euros think a 100 miles is a long way, Americans think a 100 yrs is a long time..."
Shibumi
Members Picture

22 Oct 2017
07:34:25pm
re: When were Canadian stamps first sold outside the post office?

I think we need to be clear that a RPO is not a sub-office in my understanding. An RPO is a franchise operating under a contract with Canada Post. A sub office was an actual post office.

Like
Login to Like
this post

davidgjones.authorsxpress.com/2012/05/14/david-g-jones-author-of-the-school-of-sun-tzu/
nlroberts1961
12,8 cm Kanone 43 L/55 in blueprints only
22 Oct 2017
09:05:24pm
re: When were Canadian stamps first sold outside the post office?

Here's the complete list of types

Current Post Office Classification

Type 7 / Mail Processing Plant (MPP) - huge regional mechanized sorting plants spread throughout the country. They act as distribution hubs for the purpose of speeding mail on its way.

Type 9 / Postal Station (PS) or Postal Unit (PU) - large, city postal station. There may be several in a city, all of which provide street delivery.

Type 11 / Revenue office - small, mainly rural, post offices. The facilities are generally supplied by the postmaster and may be found in a residence or store.

Type 12 / Sub-office (RPO) - found mainly in stores, this type of operation has been around for over 100 years until the replacement by the current system of franchises. After the late 1980s sub-offices (type 12) were classified as RPOs (retail postal outlets). Since Railway Post Offices (R.P.O.s) were eliminated with the final R.P.O. run on April 24, 1971, it should not be a problem differentiating the two types of postal services.

Type 14 / Semi-Staff office - corporate offices found in smaller towns and villages. Although mainly in corporate buildings (owned or leased), they may be in stores. Annual revenue would exceed that of a type 11 office. They are staffed by members of the CPAA (Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association), each post office has a 'postmaster/'

Type 15 / Staff office - larger town or city offices. In this type of jurisdiction you may find street delivery by mail carriers, as well as sub-offices responsible to and supervised by the staff office. They are staffed by members of CUPW (Canadian Union of Postal Workers), each post office has a 'lead hand' - no postmaster.

Type 24 / Gross Margin Outlet (GMO) - A postal outlet that functions very much like a sub-office under the control of a Type 15 or Type 9 post office.

Type 25 / Commercial Service Centre (CSC) - added to post offices in larger towns where an attempt was made to have the post office serve only commercial clients, and franchises were to serve all other retail clients. It appears that to a large extend this type failed and most of the CSC stations have reverted to being a full-service post office with a retail counter to serve the private citizen.

Retail Outlet (RO) - A general term for a franchised dealership selling Canada Post services and products. Postal boxes may be located on the premises. In some regions the abbreviation 'RPO' is used to refer to retail outlets. ROs are divided into three categories. (see below)

Type 43 / Urban franchised dealer (RO-A) - As the name indicates, this is a franchised situation where the host business is responsible for providing the facilities, furniture, date-stamps, etc., according to strict guidelines laid out by Canada Post. In some postal regions of the country Canada Post goes so far as to distinguish light (l), medium (m), and heavy (h) traffic areas for the Type 43 franchises. Where known to us, we will indicate this in the 'Notes' column.

Type 44 / Rural franchised dealer (RO-B) - As is the case with Type 43 discussed above, the same applies here. Canada Post chose to distinguish between those retail outlets (ROs) serving an urban vs rural market.

Type 45 / Commercial franchised dealer (RO-C) - A retail facility provided and operated by a private business or individual providing bulk sale of postal products and services and acceptance of larger volumes of mail. This type of franchise is certainly in the minority.

Type 52 / Call-For Centre - Stamp Shop (CF - SS) - This primarily a place for postal patrons to pick up parcels. A Stamp Shop is an agent selling stamps, nothing else. The two types, CF and SS, may or may not be combined. This type of office may or may not be supplied with a date-stamp. They are not listed on Canada Post's website as an office.

Type 59 / Contracted Postal Services (CPS1) - This type of office is operated under an agreement between Canada Post Corporation and an individual or company for the provision of postal services from one office.

Type 60 / Contracted Postal Services (CPS2) - This type of office is operated under an agreement between Canada Post Corporation and a community, hamlet or Indian Band Council for the provision of postal services from one office.

Type 61 / Contracted Postal Services (CPS3) - This type of office is operated under an agreement between Canada Post Corporation and an umbrella organization (e.g. Northern Stores) for the provision of postal services from a number of offices.

Type 62 / Corporate Retail Outlet (CRO) - A retail outlet providing full postal services operated by Canada Post employees, therefore not a franchise.


Like
Login to Like
this post

"Euros think a 100 miles is a long way, Americans think a 100 yrs is a long time..."
        
Please Note:
Postings that were loaded from the old Discussion Board cannot be edited.

Contact Webmaster | Visitors Online | Unsubscribe Emails


User Agreement

Copyright © 2021 Stamporama.com