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United States/Covers & Postmarks : what rate does this W399 wrapper pay?

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amsd
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Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
29 Nov 2016
09:00:42am
well?

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michael78651
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SOR Auctioneer
29 Nov 2016
05:36:02pm
re: what rate does this W399 wrapper pay?

Wrappers were usually used to mail newspapers. If memory serves, I believe newspapers were mailed second class?

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tomiseksj
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30 Nov 2016
01:12:22pm
re: what rate does this W399 wrapper pay?

I believe that the mute cancel suggests a rate other than first class.

Page 104 of The Chicago Daily News Almanac and Year-Book for 1904 (the year W399 was issued) provides the provides rate information for all four classes of domestic mail during that year.

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amsd
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Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
30 Nov 2016
01:26:46pm
re: what rate does this W399 wrapper pay?

Steven's post from the Chicago Daily News corresponds with B&W's domestic rate book. It's not likely second class, because it would need to have been more than 4 ounces (although it's possible); third class seems more likely, paying a rate to accommodate something over 2 ounces. I know that third class would have been a mute cancel (which it is on the wrapper; not sure about second class).

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michael78651
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SOR Auctioneer
30 Nov 2016
09:14:36pm
re: what rate does this W399 wrapper pay?

Second Class postage was used for newspapers and periodicals. For the time period of 1885 to 1915, your are correct that the postage rate was 1 cent per pound. I think it is conceivable that a newspaper or periodical from a larger city could easily weigh two pounds.

This link probably contains more information than you are looking for, but it does contain some interesting stuff.

https://about.usps.com/who-we-are/postal-history/periodicals-postage-history.pdf

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