What we collect!
Stamporama Discussion Board Logo
For People Who Love To Talk About Stamps


96 visitors online

United States/Covers & Postmarks : This one was too funny !

AuthorPostings
philb
Members Picture
19 Jul 2015
05:33:12pm

Auctions
When i saw this one today i could not resist !Image Not Found

Like
Login to Like
this post

"If a man would be anything, he must be himself."
michael78651
Members Picture
SOR Auctioneer
19 Jul 2015
10:21:03pm
re: This one was too funny !

What the heck is an olive oil foot?

I don't think it would be a body part from Popeye's girlfriend.

Like
Login to Like
this post

"My book, "The Whitechapel Fog" is available on Kindle!"

www.hipstamp.com/store/the-online-stamp-shop
amsd
Members Picture
Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
20 Jul 2015
08:35:04am
re: This one was too funny !

and note the fabulous Hudson Terminal (HT) mute cancel..... goodness, that's beautiful


Like
Login to Like
this post

"Save the USPS, buy stamps; save the hobby, use commemoratives"

juicyheads.com/link.php?PLJZJP
BenFranklin1902
Members Picture
Tom in Exton, PA
20 Jul 2015
09:25:26am

Auctions
re: This one was too funny !

I love prehistoric junk mail! I read an article somewhere about a seed company that sent out several catalogs a year, all addressed by hand. I do notice typewritten addresses from this era, but a good number of companies still writing on the envelopes.

The article said that they had a big room full of young women, they hired women because they were more patient and had better penmanship than men. For each customer, the woman would write the same address on 6 envelopes in succession, and each envelope would go into a different box for the bi-monthly mailings. A big labor operation! And we take it for granted today when we just click for a label run!

I also love the penmanship on old mail! I've actually saved a few nice ones in my misc album. My daughter is an elementary school teacher and said they no longer teach penmanship and cursive writing. The kids are just taught to print, and type on a computer!

Like
Login to Like
this post
michael78651
Members Picture
SOR Auctioneer
20 Jul 2015
11:39:37am
re: This one was too funny !

You might be surprised how much commercial mail still comes with handwritten addresses. Tourist bureaus, Chambers of Commerce, etc. in particular have their materials sent out with hand written addresses.

Like
Login to Like
this post

"My book, "The Whitechapel Fog" is available on Kindle!"

www.hipstamp.com/store/the-online-stamp-shop
ikeyPikey
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
11:54:54am
re: This one was too funny !

Q/ Might the 'olive oil foots' be the oil pressed from the pulp'n'seed slurry from the, uh, foot of the press? Or, less likely, the slurry itself?

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey (who prefers 'dirty old hussy' to 'extra virgin' olive oil)

Like
Login to Like
this post

"I collect stamps today precisely the way I collected stamps when I was ten years old."
Anglophile
Members Picture
RPSL, APS, EPA; US, GB, Ireland, British Europe, Italy, Mauritius Classics
20 Jul 2015
12:02:51pm
re: This one was too funny !

Online research indicates that "olive oil foots" is better known in the US as sulphur oil, a non-edible oil used for softening fabric, and used today in some conditioning preparations for long hair, especially in the African-American community. "Sicily sumac" is an edible herb that also contains large amounts of malic acid in its raw form, and apparently was prized at the turn of the century for use in leather and sheepskin tanning. It's even the subject of Congressional hearings dealing with complaints that the import tariff was too high and unfairly set up to protect "inferior Virginia sumac."

Like
Login to Like
this post

"If this message contained legal advice, it would be followed by a bill."
GeoStamper
Members Picture
Steve
20 Jul 2015
12:14:42pm
re: This one was too funny !

And thanks to David, my philatelic education continues. I had never heard of a "mute cancel" before; here's what Wikipedia says:

Quote:

"Mute cancel refers to a cancellation that includes no writing and thus "does not speak.""



Nerd

-Steve

Like
Login to Like
this post

"What are you waiting for? Those stamps aren't going to collect themselves."
BenFranklin1902
Members Picture
Tom in Exton, PA
20 Jul 2015
12:17:46pm

Auctions
re: This one was too funny !

Quote:

"You might be surprised how much commercial mail still comes with handwritten addresses. Tourist bureaus, Chambers of Commerce, etc. in particular have their materials sent out with hand written addresses."



I used to hand write my envelopes when I was a realtor and was canvassing neighborhoods. Statistics showed that it was more likely to get opened and read than a typed or labeled envelope.

Like
Login to Like
this post
ikeyPikey
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
12:32:17pm
re: This one was too funny !

Quote:

"... I used to hand write my envelopes when I was a realtor and was canvassing neighborhoods ..."



I remember when mail would arrive with a machine-printed pseudo-cursive script.

Some day, folks will wonder what that was imitating.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
Like
Login to Like
this post

"I collect stamps today precisely the way I collected stamps when I was ten years old."
Bobstamp
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
12:41:30pm
re: This one was too funny !

My wife and I were taught to type by Miss Cerny, a spinster unmarried older woman who lived in hotel near my parent's office supply store. Her only activity outside of school seemed to be sitting in the hotel lobby and knitting.

She was an excellent, if unexciting, typing teacher. She would stand in front of the class barking out individual letters, strings of letters, words, and sentences which we were expected to type on manual Underwood typewriters without letters on the keys. A large poster on the wall behind her showed the location of the keys. We were not allowed to look at the keyboard, only the poster and the paper we were typing on, although all of us tried sneaking peaks at the keyboard to make sure our hands were where we thought they would be. Did we learn to type? You bet. And both my wife and I have had jobs in which excellent typing was a requirement.

In the latter part of our teaching careers here in British Columbia, our high schools began to dump typewriters in favour of computers, and typing classes were replaced by "keyboarding" lessons, which were part of what is now known as "Information Technology" classes. Very little time was actually spent in teaching kids to type, and as a result not many good typists were produced. But, the young being what they are, sometimes achieved typing success. Our son, Paul, had a terrible typing teacher, and he never did learn fundamental touch typing. Instead he uses a combination of touch typing and hunt-and-peck, but at a blinding speed. He's easily twice as fast as his mom, and she's a lot faster than me.

To return to philately, one of my yet-unborn dreams is to collect covers with typed addresses representative of the changes in typing technology.

Bob



Like
Login to Like
this post

www.ephemeraltreasures.net
amsd
Members Picture
Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
20 Jul 2015
02:18:28pm
re: This one was too funny !

Steve

the mute cancel in this instance refers to the absence of a date. Certain classes of mail (registry, third class {now the poetically renamed Standard B}) use mute cancels (registry will include the date on the back cancel, and all transit cancels). I am not sure why this has a mute cancel. Assuming it's not overweight, it pays the 2c first class rate in effect until April (I think) when rates were increased to 3c as part of a war measures act. All first class mail should be date stamped, although there's a California PO with mute cancels.

David

Like
Login to Like
this post

"Save the USPS, buy stamps; save the hobby, use commemoratives"

juicyheads.com/link.php?PLJZJP
BenFranklin1902
Members Picture
Tom in Exton, PA
20 Jul 2015
04:15:47pm

Auctions
re: This one was too funny !

Quote:

"She was an excellent, if unexciting, typing teacher. She would stand in front of the class barking out individual letters, strings of letters, words, and sentences which we were expected to type on manual Underwood typewriters without letters on the keys. A large poster on the wall behind her showed the location of the keys. We were not allowed to look at the keyboard, only the poster and the paper we were typing on, although all of us tried sneaking peaks at the keyboard to make sure our hands were where we thought they would be. Did we learn to type? You bet. And both my wife and I have had jobs in which excellent typing was a requirement.
"



I learned to type in the eighth grade, while I was a student at a US military school for dependents in Germany. As a kid, my first thought when I saw "Typing" on my schedule, I thought it was an error. Once confirmed I, and other boys, were supposed to be there I got intrigued with the big ole IBM manual typewriters with no digits on the keys.

Something told me that I needed to learn this. I couldn't have foretold that I'd someday spend most of my workday on a computer, but I did know that I spent a lot of time hunting and pecking letters to my grandparents in the USA on a manual portable typewriter my mother owned. So at least knowing how to type would help me with my letter writing.

I was scared to death with the digitless keyboards and had no idea how we'd ever learn this. But soon enough we were doing the fff jjj exercises and in a semester I could type like the wind. I was quite pleased with myself that I had mastered something, since I hadn't done so with musical instruments.

I started high school in the USA and was scheduled for a Typing class. I told the teacher I could type and she just said, "yea, yea, sit down". So I sat down and quickly typed a full page that started out "I don't know why teachers don't listen to their students..." She was stunned and sent me to the principal's office for reassignment of that hour.

All through school my typing skills did me well. I typed term papers for pay, so I wound up getting my very own portable electric typewriter for Christmas. I set up my little mail order business "TnT Stamps" and typed all my letters and invoices.

I was working for an engineering firm as a draftsman and Computer Aided Design was invented and installed in our company. I used my typing skills to secure a place on the pilot team for that system. While everyone else was trying to learn the complicated command structure AND find the keys, I just had to concentrate on the commands. The next ten years I was a consultant installing CAD systems in companies.

When my kids were little my daughters thought it was amazing to come up behind me as I was typing on our home PC, and cover my eyes, to watch me continue to type. Today I continue to use my typing skills, as I am right now. Full ten fingers! I work from home a lot and spend my days communicating via the Internet and phone with colleagues around the world. I sure got my money's worth out of that eighth grade typing class!
Like
Login to Like
this post
TuskenRaider
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
07:41:13pm
re: This one was too funny !

Hi Everyone;

BenFranklin1902 said;

Quote:

"I also love the penmanship on old mail! I've actually saved a few nice ones in my misc album.
My daughter is an elementary school teacher and said they no longer teach penmanship and
cursive writing. The kids are just taught to print, and type on a computer!"



Good luck to all those kids if they try to sign a real estate contract. The last time I checked printed
signatures are not legally binding on contracts.

Just my 2 drachmas....
TuskenRaider
Like
Login to Like
this post

www.webstore.com/store,pgr,37572,user_id,37572,ac,shop
Bobstamp
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
07:53:14pm
re: This one was too funny !

Actually, when my sister and I sold our mom's house, I was able to use a "graphical" digital signature (which looked nothing like my actual signature) on the final documents. Ditto on the documents we signed to sell our previous apartment here in Vancouver and to buy our new apartment.

Bob

Like
Login to Like
this post

www.ephemeraltreasures.net
ikeyPikey
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
08:17:06pm
re: This one was too funny !

Quote:

"... The last time I checked printed signatures are not legally binding on contracts ..."



You mean that's TRUE ?!@#$%?

I always thought that was a bubbameister they used to get you to learn cursive.

In fact, I know of cultures where signatures look more like icons than words, so expect this to vary from place-to-place, 'true' or not.

Legend has it that inked fingerprints were first widely used in lieu of signatures for illiterate employees.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
Like
Login to Like
this post

"I collect stamps today precisely the way I collected stamps when I was ten years old."
philb
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
08:23:04pm

Auctions
re: This one was too funny !

i think the joint on Water street was a front for Don Vitos operations !

Like
Login to Like
this post

"If a man would be anything, he must be himself."
Anglophile
Members Picture
RPSL, APS, EPA; US, GB, Ireland, British Europe, Italy, Mauritius Classics
20 Jul 2015
08:49:07pm
re: This one was too funny !

Sicilian-American here ... you belong over there in the locker room with the guys talking about Cosby and Jenner! I'm offended, offended! Compensate me!

Like
Login to Like
this post

"If this message contained legal advice, it would be followed by a bill."
philb
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
10:37:44pm

Auctions
re: This one was too funny !

i am lucky..only half Sicilian !

Like
Login to Like
this post

"If a man would be anything, he must be himself."
philb
Members Picture
20 Jul 2015
10:42:42pm

Auctions
re: This one was too funny !

Its a bit off track but i would never be ashamed of my heritage no matter what it is.

Like
Login to Like
this post

"If a man would be anything, he must be himself."
        
Please Note:
Postings that were loaded from the old Discussion Board cannot be edited.

Contact Webmaster | Visitors Online | Unsubscribe Emails


This site is provided by Roy Lingen at www.buckacover.com

User Agreement

Copyright © 2019 Stamporama.com