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Asia/China : China stamps and WWII pass

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Bullsnbears
19 Apr 2015
08:22:30pm
Image Not FoundImage Not FoundHello: My Uncle was in WWII and used this pass when he was in China I scanned the pass with the stamps and a photo copy of him with others in the photo. Don't know anymore about the stamps/pass etc. Any feedback or info appreciated.
Thanks
Stosh

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samliu
19 Apr 2015
10:22:05pm
re: China stamps and WWII pass

The stamps are tax revenue stamps. The "pass" is a receipt (proof) that someone paid something.

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Bullsnbears
19 Apr 2015
10:35:34pm
re: China stamps and WWII pass

Thank You

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Bobstamp
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20 Apr 2015
12:38:47pm
re: China stamps and WWII pass

Fascinating, Bullsnbears. Do you know anything about what he was doing? I was recently writing, as an aside to another topic, about China's role in the Second World War and its affect on the forest industry in British Columbia. See my web page, Payday at Woodfibre (part 5). If you're interested in the entire story, go to Payday at Woodfibre (part 1).

Bob

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amsd
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Editor, Seal News; contributor, JuicyHeads
20 Apr 2015
02:22:13pm
re: China stamps and WWII pass

Bob, I knew about Japanese-Americans, but not Japanese-Canadians, who, ultimately, had it worse.

China IS fascinating during this period. You are correct that Chiang's troops were fighting two wars, just as Mao's troops were. Mao's troops fared better in virtually all contests. A third front were the war lords, with their private armies. Mao was more successful in getting their alignment with his troops, either because of greater preceived shared interests or because, even at this stage, it was clear that Chiang's troops were overmatched.

Stillwell, commander in theatre, had little use for Chiang, but followed Marshall's edicts that Chiang, while he might never win a battle, still tied up 1.5 million Japanese troops that might otherwise be fighting elsewhere. And so we tie together the original image and your excellent web page. I also recommend Tuchmen's book, STILLWELL IN CHINA, for a view into a part of the war that most Americans have no idea even existed.

David

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AirmailEd
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20 Apr 2015
11:13:31pm
re: China stamps and WWII pass

I think I've seen that picture before. It might have been in Barbara Tuchman's book. David, I think you're referring to Stillwell and the American Experience in China.

I especially remember the casual guy in the back. Stosh, if I'm reading your message correctly, that is your Uncle Joe. Is that correct?

Ed Foster

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Bullsnbears
21 Apr 2015
10:51:33am
re: China stamps and WWII pass

Hello Ed: No my Uncle is the Service Man shaking hands right in the front that picture is his own photograph that was taken and given to him. He served in CHina, spoke fluent Chinese. What I got from him and my dad is that he served in CHina with or Under the 2 gentleman in the back Thanks for your interest etc. I will do some more checking to see what else I can come up with
Have a great day!

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Bullsnbears
21 Apr 2015
10:53:23am
re: China stamps and WWII pass

Hello David: Thanks for your response…my uncle served in CHina..spoke fluent Chinese trying to do a little more research
thanks

have a great day!

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cdj1122
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Silence in the face of adversity is the father of complicity and collusion, the first cousins of conspiracy..
27 Apr 2015
12:22:39pm
re: China stamps and WWII pass

" ... Stillwell, commander in theatre, had little use for Chiang, ..."

Whom he referred to in cables to Washington as "Peanut".

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".... You may think you understood what you thought I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you think you heard is not what I thought I meant. .... "
        
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